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Opinion

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    Tuesday marked 17 years since the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, a day that changed our country forever and a date that will forever be marked in infamy. 

    Ask a group of people and it is likely that 99 percent or more can recall where they were and what they were doing when they found out what happened that morning.

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    If you haven’t taken a drive around town lately, it is clear to see that political season locally is in full swing. 

    Campaign signs are popping up everywhere it seems, and some are still left over from the May primary. It seems that, locally at least, political season really heats up beginning with the Fourth of July celebration, as candidates for local offices march in the parade or have booths set up. 

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    If your family is like mine, you probably eat a lot of meals out in restaurants these days.

    No, it’s not about my wife’s cooking. She’s an excellent cook, and her food is among the best you’ll put in your mouth.

    But we are like many families these days, busy and on the run most of the time to one place or another, and we simply don’t take the time to cook a large meal every day. Instead, we grab something at a restaurant and save the time and clean-up work in the kitchen.

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    Despite how it often seems, I’ve long believed that the world is still full of wonderful people doing amazing things on a daily basis. 

    It’s hard to see that some days, but that was reaffirmed to me recently as I spent seven days in the Dominican Republic in the city of Santiago, alongside my wife and 19 Lindsey Wilson College students and alumni, working with GO Ministries. 

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    Not being from Campbellsville, I don’t have the memories many of you have growing up here.

    You recall things from 10, 20, 30 or more years ago, and you remember the good old days. However, in some cases, the good old days may not have been as good as the days we are experiencing right now. 

    Take the Fourth of July, for example.

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    The journalists at the Capital Gazette newspaper in Annapolis, Maryland, amaze me. In the face of one of the darkest tragedies one can imagine – watching their coworkers mercilessly gunned down by a man filled with hatred toward the newspaper and its reporters – the Capital Gazette staff carried on and published a newspaper the following day. That’s exactly what happened last Thursday when five members of the newspaper’s staff were killed. And still, the next day, the Capital Gazette put out a paper.

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    What if I told you that more than a thousand people recently died on American soil due to a natural disaster? 

    You would probably be shocked, right? Disturbed? You would probably be wondering why it hasn’t been all over the news, why there weren’t massive operations to provide relief to those affected. 

  • When I volunteer to get a shot, you know it’s serious. That’s the case with the health crisis of hepatitis A in Kentucky right now. It is a very serious problem, and one I believe should be met head on with the vaccine for the threatening illness.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, hepatitis A is a very contagious liver infection that can be contracted by being exposed to contaminated food, or from someone who is infected with the disease. The best prevention is simply washing your hands.

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    In Kentucky last year, 23,785 felony cases resulted in a conviction. In each case, there was a victim who had to navigate a complicated judicial system at a severe disadvantage to those accused of doing them harm. Too often, the criminal justice system meant to work for them caused even more anguish.

    It shouldn’t be this way in Kentucky. And, with your help in November, it won’t be much longer.

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    For many months, we have been working to resolve the toughest financial crisis Kentucky has ever faced, a crisis that began many years ago and that previous governors and legislators either negligently handled or ignored. It is now snowballing out of control. Nothing about this process has been easy. That does not, however, take away from the present reality that we are facing, or from the difficult decisions that must still be made.

  • The Taylor County Board of Education is getting its superintendent search underway, as it was announced Monday night that 12 candidates had placed their names into the mix to be the leader of the district.

    The process is just in the early stages, and a superintendent is not expected to be announced until the beginning of June. There is still a lot to be discussed and evaluated moving forward, but one thing the board should keep in mind as this process unfolds is transparency.

  •  

    The Taylor County Board of Education is getting its superintendent search underway, as it was announced Monday night that 12 candidates had placed their names into the mix to be the leader of the district.

    The process is just in the early stages, and a superintendent is not expected to be announced until the beginning of June. There is still a lot to be discussed and evaluated moving forward, but one thing the board should keep in mind as this process unfolds is transparency.

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    As we observe Black History Month, I find myself reflecting on a recent trip that taught me more about the history of our nation, including some of the cruelest times imaginable. It was a visit to Memphis, Tennessee, to the National Civil Rights Museum, and it was a trip well worth taking.

    The Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. spent his life fighting for equality. He did so until his death on April 4, 1968, in Memphis.

  •  “Why would you give a needle to a drug addict?”

    Admittedly, I once thought that was a very stupid question. It would just enable an addict, make it easier for them to do their drug of choice. Why make needles easier to get? These were all thoughts I had when I first heard about syringe exchange programs.

    And so when I hear people express these thoughts, I don’t automatically discredit them, because it wasn’t that long ago that I thought the exact same thing.

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    For more than 100 years, this newspaper, or a version of it by various names, has brought the news to Taylor County.

  • I have spent a significant amount of time reading and trying to gather as much information about the horrific events that took place in Charlottesville, Virginia, this weekend. Masses of protesters and counter-protesters clashed and one person was killed and 19 or 20 others injured when a 20-year-old man from Ohio (but recently moved from the Florence, Kentucky area) drove his car into the crowd, plowing over anyone and everyone in his path.

  • As we turn the page on July 2017, I find myself asking the same question once again, “Is summer over already?” To the disappointment of most Kentucky students, and many parents, the answer is an overwhelming “yes.”

  • Welcome, Kentucky Derby visitors!
    That’s our hospitable greeting each year as we update you on Kentucky’s political landscape, which continues to be of national interest.

  • A wide array of bills were heard in committees and voted out of the Senate in a busy and exciting third week of the 2017 Session. Because this year’s 30-day meeting of the Kentucky General Assembly is considered a “short session,” we make sure we maximize our time here in Frankfort.

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    Before the dust settled from the November election, President-elect Donald Trump waded out into turbulent waters by expressing his dislike for flag burning. Even though this may not be a “front burner” (pardon the pun) issue for many Americans, it does present us with interesting ambiguities.

    For instance, if a ban is passed on flag burning, how will VFW posts all over the country properly dispose of worn and tattered flags?  Ironically, burning a flag can be both a symbol of respect and contempt in America.