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Today's Opinions

  • Saving rural hospitals will improve quality of life

    We’re all familiar with the skyrocketing wealth inequality in the U.S. But health care is another growing area of inequality that doesn’t get talked about as much, perhaps because those most affected by the change primarily live in rural areas.

    One in 20 rural hospitals in the U.S. have closed in less than a decade, and one in five of those still open are at high risk of closing in the near future, especially if the economy takes a turn for the worse, according to a new report from Navigant Consulting.

  • Be a hero; donate lifesaving blood

    Many times it doesn’t cross our minds until a disaster strikes, but the need for donations at the Kentucky Blood Center (KBC) never really diminishes. Every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood — something that is always in short supply at hospitals, according to the KBC, a community-based nonprofit organization that has been providing lifesaving blood products to hospitals throughout the state for more than 50 years.

  • Bills tackle fair elections, healthcare, heinous crimes

    By State Senator Max Wise (KY -16)

    Squeaky floors. No vote-counting tote boards. And nearly two-century-old decor.

    That’s what greeted Senators when they convened for the fourth week of the 153rd regular session of the Kentucky General Assembly on Tuesday inside the Old State Capitol Building. The nostalgia commemorated President’s Day, often used to observe the birthday of one of Kentucky’s greatest sons, President Abraham Lincoln. The 16th President of the United States would have been 210 this year.

  • From the Reporter's Desk: Pensions and what I want to see this session

     

    Christmas is just around the corner, and while I suppose I am too old to give Santa a Christmas wish list, I instead opted to present a wish list for what I hope to see come from the Kentucky Legislature when they convene in January for the 2019 Legislative Session. 

  • The latest controversy... or lack thereof

     

    All the rage lately has been about the song, “Baby It’s Cold Outside” since a radio station in Ohio decided to remove the song from its Christmas playlist, citing customer complaints that the song promotes date rape and in particular some concerns about the lyric “what’s in this drink?” 

    Personally, I’m not sure what the song’s intent was, and let’s face it, we will never really know for certain. The writer, Frank Loesser, passed away in 1969, so really all we have is speculation. 

  • Want bipartisanship in D.C.? Tell Mitch McConnell

     

    I frequently hear people talking about the lack of bipartisanship in Washington, D.C., and for good reason. It seems like every time you turn on the television, you hear more of the bickering back and forth between Republicans and Democrats and less of the two sides working together to create real change for the constituents they represent. 

    There is an opportunity for that in Congress now, but Kentucky’s senior senator, Mitch McConnell, is standing in the way, along with a small band of Republican senators. 

  • Remembering Ed Waggener

     

    I was saddened to find out that a friend of mine, Mr. Ed Waggener, passed away Monday following complications from a heart attack several days ago. 

    Many know Ed from his work as the editor/publisher with Columbia Magazine and for his work in newspapers in this region of Kentucky for many years. Ed is an icon when it comes to journalism, and he engaged communities in this region as well as anyone. Ed covered a lot of topics in Campbellsville/Taylor County as part of the seven county coverage area of Columbia Magazine. 

  • Remembering 9/11

     

    Tuesday marked 17 years since the tragic events of Sept. 11, 2001, a day that changed our country forever and a date that will forever be marked in infamy. 

    Ask a group of people and it is likely that 99 percent or more can recall where they were and what they were doing when they found out what happened that morning.