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Today's News

  • Deaton resigns as Tiger football boss

    After three seasons, Campbellsville University head football coach Jim Deaton has announced his resignation.

    "After much thought and prayer, I felt a change of leadership was needed to bring about the quickest turnaround of the Campbellsville University football program," Deaton said.

    "I am thankful for the opportunity to have coached at Campbellsville University and I appreciate the support shown by the faculty, staff, students, players and fans during the past three seasons.

  • Lady Tigers now 4-0 after road win at Union

    Campbellsville University's Lady Tigers made it 4-0 with a 96-82 road triumph at Union (Ky.) College on Thursday night in Barbourville.

    Coach Ginger Colvin's club held double-digit leads in both halves before the Lady Dogs fought back within striking distance.

    Jenna Hedges' long three-pointer just before intermission pushed Campbellsville's lead back to four (43-39) and the Lady Tigers put up a 53-point second half.

    Freshman Courtney Danis paced CU with 22 points while junior Juliana Brown and sophomore Kristi Ensminger added 14 apiece and senior Priscila Alves 12.

  • What's gone wrong with Tiger football

    The talk around the water fountain, at local sporting events and in the local eating establishments is what had gone wrong with Campbellsville University Fighting Tiger football?

    What has happened to a program that once competed for Mid-South Conference titles and had Courier-Journal sports columnist Rick Bozich cover a snowy home game with Georgetown?

    How does a program that chalked up eight seven-or-more victory campaigns, only win six games in its last three years?

    Here are some of the facts and speculation and hopefully a solution or two:

  • LYNC program offers nurse aid training

    Several students recently completed their certified nurse aide classes through Campbellsville LYNC. They are Samantha Booth, Kayla Buis, Lastashia Burton, Megan Foley, Dayna Holmes, Kristee Parton and Amanda Schubert.

    The LYNC serves Taylor, Adair, Casey and Green counties. It is funded by Cumberlands Workforce Investment Board through the U.S. Department of Labor. It is administered locally by the Lake Cumberland Area Development District with Workforce Investment Act Title One monies.

    For more information about LYNC programs and qualifications, call 465-5349.

  • WKU admissions counselor to visit TCHS on Monday, Nov. 19

    Will Gramling, an admissions counselor at Western Kentucky University, will be visiting Taylor County High School to discuss with prospective students the opportunities offered at WKU.

    Gramling will visit the school Monday, Nov. 19 from 10:45 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

    For more information, contact the WKU Admissions Office via e-mail at admission@wku.edu or by phone at (270) 745-2551.

  • Named sources are always better

    When Judith Miller was arrested and jailed for not releasing to authorities the name of the person who outed then-undercover CIA agent Valerie Plame, the world of journalism was turned upside down.

    Realizing that it would be a long shot for me to receive Miller treatment in Central Kentucky because I wouldn't release a source to authorities didn't matter. News sources are sacred. But, then, we seldom use unnamed sources anyway.

    That didn't matter either.

    Recently, the U.S. House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed The Free Flow of Information Act.

  • TRH to host lung cancer program

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers. In 2007, lung cancer will account for about 15 percent of all cancer diagnoses and 29 percent of all cancer deaths.

    It is the second most diagnosed cancer in men and women (after prostate and breast, respectively), but it is the No. 1 cause of death from cancer each year in both men and women.

    Because lung cancer can take years to develop, it is mostly found in older people. The average age of a person receiving a lung cancer diagnosis is 69 years.

  • Violating probation gets man five years

    A Louisville man has been sentenced to five years in prison after violating the terms of his shock probation.

    Joseph "Joe" Quinten Seadler III, 24, of 1047 E. Kentucky St. appeared before Taylor Circuit Court Judge Doughlas M. George on Tuesday, Oct. 23.

  • Soups can warm you up on chilly nights

    These chilly night I find myself looking for soup recipes. I try new ones every year, but more often than not, I go back to the same old favorites. Here are two of them.

    The first one, Sausage-Bean Chowder, is a long-time favorite of my family. It smells absolutely wonderful when it's cooking and is really delicious. It tastes even better the second day. My dad used to like this soup so much he requested it for a Christmas present one year. I made and froze 4 quarts, and he carried it back to Illinois in a cooler, where he rationed it and made it last a long time.

  • Police/Court briefs

    Two charged in sealed indictment

    A Campbellsville resident has been indicted on a stolen property charge in an indictment recently unsealed by a Taylor Circuit Court judge.

    A grand jury may seal an indictment if there is a possibility that the accused will try to evade police.

    Jeremy W. Holstin, 35, of 508 Coakley St. and James L. Whitehead, 28, of Brush Creek in Greensburg were indicted on a charge of receiving more than $300 in stolen property. Holstin was also charged with being a first-degree persistent felony offender.