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Opinion

  • The proposed nickel tax is a popular topic of conversation in our community. The Campbellsville Independent School District has chosen not to make any public statements concerning this because, quite simply, it is not our referendum.

    However, due to recent incorrect allegations, I now find it necessary to clarify the misinformation in a public manner.

  • The Central Kentucky News-Journal welcomes letters on a variety of topics, including letters about political races and candidates.

    We anticipate there will be letters written supporting and possibly criticizing candidates. If you support a candidate, write and tell our readers the reasons why. If there’s a candidate you don’t particularly like, you can write about that, too.

    Use good taste and don’t libel anyone. You can say what you believe, but personal attacks or allegations that cannot be verified will not be accepted.

  • It's one thing to contribute time or money to a fundraiser. It's another to go without - just like the people you're trying to help.

    Nearly 70 students last week went without food for 30 hours. That's a long time - especially for growing teenagers.

    These teens were trying to raise money to help put a stop to world hunger. And raise money is just what they did - enough to feed more than 80 children for an entire year.

  • In a landmark decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, Justice William Brennan wrote this country has "a profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials."

    Kentucky legislators failed to honor that principle when they voted to allow elected school board members to evaluate the performance of school superintendents in secret.

  • The News-Journal published an opinion piece by "Insight" Teen Writer Emily Combs on Monday, March 29.

    In her article, Combs stated that while she would never choose abortion herself, she believed that making it illegal would not stop it from happening.

    There were two factual errors in Combs' article that we here at the News-Journal neglected to correct and we regret that omission.

    According to a timeline from the National Right to Life Foundation, the Supreme Court ruling in Roe vs. Wade made abortion legal in January 1973.

  • For those who might have missed it, Monday's issue of the News-Journal included a story about the Kentucky Supreme Court's ruling on two lawsuits - one filed in 2003 and the other in 2004.

    The lawsuits, filed by Taylor County resident Katherine Moss against both Campbellsville Independent and Taylor County school systems, were settled and dismissed in 2007 - but the terms of the settlement were kept secret.

    And that's against the law.

  • Whether it's through a parent, a spouse, a child, a grandparent, a friend or even ourselves, cancer will reach out its deadly hand and touch us all. And that's why we should all be concerned with research into its cure.

    What could have once killed us, is now treatable, thanks to research.

    And that's what gives us hope.

    As the second leading cause of the death in the United States, cancer will affect all too many of us. We each have a risk - experts say half of all men and a third of all women will be diagnosed with some form of the disease.

  • Did you know there are math problems in today's newspaper? What about a language arts quiz? Or a science or social studies project in the making?

    Well, local teachers have known this for years. That's why many are firm believers in the Newspapers In Education program, a worldwide initiative that promotes the use of newspapers in the classroom.

    Educators say using the newspaper in their classrooms provides a real-world connection that is motivating and adds real-life dimension to their classrooms.

  • The state of Kentucky, the city of Campbellsville and the county of Taylor are hotbeds for basketball.

    Campbellsville and Taylor County kept their boys' high school basketball seasons alive and advanced in post-season play to this week's Fifth Region Tournament at Nelson County.

    It was the Eagles' 22nd overall district boys' crown and the eighth since Tim Davis came to guide the Eagles before the 1995-96 campaign.

    During that 15-year span, the Eagles have made 10 trips to the Fifth Region Tournament.

  • Last week, Taylor County School Board members unanimously approved a resolution adopting an extra nickel tax.

    Predictably, opposition has arisen and petitions are circulating against the proposed tax. Ultimately, this issue may come before residents for a vote.

    In the meantime, we encourage open, rational and intelligent discussion with factual information provided from both sides. See the story on today's front page.

  • Kudos to workers in the City and County road departments for their long, tiring hours of work during the recent snowstorm.

    While the rest of us were snug in our warm homes, they were out in the cold, salting and scraping the roads so we could get where we needed to go.

    Snow fell last Friday night nearly as fast as they could clear it, yet roads were still passable on Saturday.

    We appreciate your hard work!

     

  • Reduce, Reuse and Recycle. Those are the code words these days. With the push in recent years to "go green" in order to save the nation's vital natural resources for generations to come, it's time we all started taking at least small steps to help the environment.

    And some have found it's not quite as hard as it might seem.

    If you don't already know, both the City of Campbellsville and Waste Management have recycling bins available.

  • It's way more than just great cookies.

    Chartered by Congress in March 1950, Girl Scouts of the USA is the world's top organization dedicated solely to girls where all are accepted and nurtured and taught the skills to build character and reach success in the real world.

    With the help of committed adult volunteers, girls develop qualities that will serve them all their lives, like leadership, strong values, social conscience, and conviction about their own potential and self-worth.

  • We've known for years that our community is made up of residents who care about others.

    From the various school and sports fundraisers our children participate in to community events such as Relay for Life and Crusade for Children, local residents never hesitate to dig deep into their pockets for others.

    And when there's not enough money to spare, our residents give of their time.

    With the devastating earthquake in Haiti, several local groups are spearheading donation drives to help victims. See the story on today's front page about what you can do to help.

  • Many little girls grow up dreaming of a chance to participate in the annual Junior Miss program. And that dream came true for one local young woman this year.

    MeLeigha Pollock will represent Taylor County at the state competition this weekend in Lexington.

    MeLeigha will put her best foot forward and do an outstanding job, as have all those who have gone before her. She will participate this weekend in the talent, self-expression, fitness, judges' interview and scholastics preliminaries, with the finals set for Saturday evening.

  • At Monday night's County budget meeting, magistrates said they planned to consider holding off on giving pay raises to County employees this year. They all said they felt that would be best.

    While that's likely not considered a positive to those employees involved, it should be to the rest of the community.

    Workers across the community, the state and even the nation are having to bite the economic recession bullet. Those who still have jobs are grateful every day - or should be.

  • By the end of this week, a new year will have begun - 2010. Almost hard to believe, isn't it?

    As we move ahead, we know that New Year's resolutions can be a dime a dozen. We all make them, and few of us follow them through. But that doesn't mean we shouldn't try.

    We may have a few personal things that we're going to resolve in 2010 - trim a few pounds, stop smoking, get right with God, rekindle a friendship, or be a better person.

    As a community, our resolutions may not be so personal, even though we could certainly work as one toward many goals.

  • It's unfortunate, but there will always be people who believe they're entitled to something for nothing - and that something may be yours.

    In the past, we've passed along tips from local law enforcement officials on how to keep our Christmas safe from the ultimate Grinch. And with the struggling economy, there could be even more thieves prowling our neighborhoods at night.

    Most thefts and burglaries occur between December and February, according to Campbellsville Police Chief Dennis Benningfield. And because of that, we should all be a little more careful.

  • And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus, that all the world should be taxed. (And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.) And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

    And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David) To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.

  • If you've been having trouble getting into the holiday spirit, this past weekend was made just for you. And there's plenty more to come in the next few weeks.

    From the live nativity scene at Miller Park - and the accompanying Christmas music at the amphitheater, Saturday's Christmas parade and Sunday's Campbellsville Woman's Club Christmas Home Tour to the concerts over the weekend - and yet to come - at Campbellsville University, there were plenty of opportunities for entertainment.