.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • It is a typical scene in our office.

    A person - generally irate - although sometimes simply confused - walks through the door, picks up a paper from the stand and slaps it on the counter.

    Wait - I take that back. Sometimes they are angry and confused.

    Sometimes they shake the paper.

    Other times, they turn a few pages and jab a finger at an article.

    "Who wrote this?" they demand.

    Sometimes they add a few choice words.

  • Thousands of people showed up last weekend for what many claim is the largest July Fourth Celebration in the state.

    Indeed, how many such celebrations can lay claim to a visit from U.S. Senator Mitch McConnell?

    Regardless of all the dignitary participation, the four days worth of events attract people from all walks of life. Where else can one celebrate for four days at no cost?

  • Campbellsville’s own Jefra Bland was chosen as third runner-up in the Miss Kentucky Scholarship Pageant in Lexington over the weekend. She was also the winner of the Miss Congeniality title. Another Campbellsville native, Elizabeth Ellis, also participated.

    Local girls have traditionally done well in scholarship and beauty pageants. And behind the scenes, we’re sure the girls are supportive of each other and encouraging. That kind of sportsmanship is needed in all areas of life.

    Thanks for representing Campbellsville so well, we’re proud of you!

  • Patriotism, according to Webster, is the "love of country; devotion to the welfare of one's country; the virtues and actions of a patriot; the passion which inspires one to serve one's country."

    We all show patriotism in different ways.

    Some join the military in order to serve their country. Others proudly fly an American flag. Still others serve the country in elected office, while some simply hold that feeling inside.

  • The voters have spoken. There is to be no extra nickel paid to the Taylor County School District in annual property taxes.

    That also means that, for now, Taylor County Elementary students will continue to attend class in an overcrowded building that leaks and has a continuing problem with mold and sewer issues.

  • Tuesday is Election Day, the day that will decide the fate of the nickel tax proposed by the Taylor County School District. Only those living within the Taylor County School District boundaries and are registered voters are eligible to participate in this decision.

  • Councilman Mike Hall Jr. asked a question at last week's Campbellsville City Council meeting that deserved an answer.

    He didn't get one.

    Mayor Brenda Allen had asked the Council for its approval to hire Tony Smith as an information technology specialist. The plan is for Smith to be a shared employee, with the City paying 40 percent of his $40,000 salary and the County paying 60 percent plus benefits.

  • The sound of children laughing, bells ringing, music playing ... the smell of popcorn, cotton candy, hamburgers and lemonade.

    Now that it's back in full swing, the Taylor County Fair continues to get bigger and better.

    We can only imagine all the volunteer hours required to put together a week of activities like this.

    This past Saturday marked the first events for this year's fair with the youth and adult horse shows. So far this week, we've had several beauty pageants - with many more to come.

  • Taylor Countians continue to step up in tough times.

    This past weekend's Crusade for Children drive raised nearly $31,000. Although that number was down from last year's $38,000, it's still a significant amount in this time of economic hardship.

    Considering the fact that firefighters didn't go door to door this year, that makes the effort even more impressive.

     

  • This week and next mark the official end of childhood for area high school seniors. They'll be considered "grownups" now.

    Sure, they have the summer to look forward to ... sunny days at the lake, sleeping late, last gatherings with their friends, but, for many, the dog days of summer are the last of the carefree times.

    Adulthood is now staring them in the face.

  • Mental health problems are both prevalent and painful - for adults, of course, but also for children. Children and adolescents with mental health problems (about one in five young people have a diagnosable mental health issue) are particularly susceptible to words that make fun of mental health problems, and attitudes reflecting a lack of understanding and compassion.

  • We're down to the wire now. Tuesday is Primary Election Day. Are you ready to make the best choices?

    When we vote, it's important to ask ourselves two vital questions:

    -- Have I examined all the issues I feel are most important and learned where each candidates stands?

    -- Am I truly voting for the candidate I believe will do the best job?

    Go vote. It's as simple as that.

  • The proposed nickel tax is a popular topic of conversation in our community. The Campbellsville Independent School District has chosen not to make any public statements concerning this because, quite simply, it is not our referendum.

    However, due to recent incorrect allegations, I now find it necessary to clarify the misinformation in a public manner.

  • The Central Kentucky News-Journal welcomes letters on a variety of topics, including letters about political races and candidates.

    We anticipate there will be letters written supporting and possibly criticizing candidates. If you support a candidate, write and tell our readers the reasons why. If there’s a candidate you don’t particularly like, you can write about that, too.

    Use good taste and don’t libel anyone. You can say what you believe, but personal attacks or allegations that cannot be verified will not be accepted.

  • It's one thing to contribute time or money to a fundraiser. It's another to go without - just like the people you're trying to help.

    Nearly 70 students last week went without food for 30 hours. That's a long time - especially for growing teenagers.

    These teens were trying to raise money to help put a stop to world hunger. And raise money is just what they did - enough to feed more than 80 children for an entire year.

  • In a landmark decision of the Supreme Court of the United States, Justice William Brennan wrote this country has "a profound national commitment to the principle that debate on public issues should be uninhibited, robust and wide-open, and that it may well include vehement, caustic, and sometimes unpleasantly sharp attacks on government and public officials."

    Kentucky legislators failed to honor that principle when they voted to allow elected school board members to evaluate the performance of school superintendents in secret.

  • The News-Journal published an opinion piece by "Insight" Teen Writer Emily Combs on Monday, March 29.

    In her article, Combs stated that while she would never choose abortion herself, she believed that making it illegal would not stop it from happening.

    There were two factual errors in Combs' article that we here at the News-Journal neglected to correct and we regret that omission.

    According to a timeline from the National Right to Life Foundation, the Supreme Court ruling in Roe vs. Wade made abortion legal in January 1973.

  • For those who might have missed it, Monday's issue of the News-Journal included a story about the Kentucky Supreme Court's ruling on two lawsuits - one filed in 2003 and the other in 2004.

    The lawsuits, filed by Taylor County resident Katherine Moss against both Campbellsville Independent and Taylor County school systems, were settled and dismissed in 2007 - but the terms of the settlement were kept secret.

    And that's against the law.

  • Whether it's through a parent, a spouse, a child, a grandparent, a friend or even ourselves, cancer will reach out its deadly hand and touch us all. And that's why we should all be concerned with research into its cure.

    What could have once killed us, is now treatable, thanks to research.

    And that's what gives us hope.

    As the second leading cause of the death in the United States, cancer will affect all too many of us. We each have a risk - experts say half of all men and a third of all women will be diagnosed with some form of the disease.

  • Did you know there are math problems in today's newspaper? What about a language arts quiz? Or a science or social studies project in the making?

    Well, local teachers have known this for years. That's why many are firm believers in the Newspapers In Education program, a worldwide initiative that promotes the use of newspapers in the classroom.

    Educators say using the newspaper in their classrooms provides a real-world connection that is motivating and adds real-life dimension to their classrooms.