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Opinion

  • In about a hundred hours the calendar will flip to a new year - 2008. Almost hard to believe, isn't it?

    But as we move ahead, we know that promises can be a dime a dozen. The ones we make that are worth carrying through are as scarce as a hen's teeth. But that doesn't mean we shouldn't try.

    We may have a few personal things that we're going to resolve in 2008 - trim a few pounds, stop smoking, get right with God, rekindle a friendship, or be a better mom or dad.

  • And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be taxed.

    (And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.)

    And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

    And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David:)

  • It's a shame it's even necessary, but a recent purchase by the County makes good financial sense.

    Taylor Fiscal Court recently bought a $7,435 machine that will let County employees make road signs themselves rather than having to order them to help cut the cost.

    Last year alone, the County spent $8,900 on signs. With the new machine, hopefully that cost will decrease to the cost of supplies.

  • And we're off, to coin a popular Derby day refrain.

    Last Tuesday, Steve Beshear was inaugurated as Kentucky's new governor. Let's hope that Campbellsville and Taylor County are as well represented in what happens during the next four years as we were in Beshear's inaugural parade.

    Band members from Campbellsville and Taylor County high schools as well as the Campbellsville University Marching Tigers were a part of Tuesday's celebration.

    It's commendable that our small community had three groups invited to be a part of such a momentous occasion.

  • Someone once said: "The manner of giving is worth more than the gift."

    And around this community the hearts are always warmer than the dead-of-winter weather.

    The Holiday Helpline has ensured that nearly 400 families will have a better Christmas than they might have had otherwise. But the Helpline isn't taking credit. That credit belongs to the community - the one that is always so giving.

  • Jolly Old St. Nick. St. Nicholas. Mr. Claus. Ho Ho. All are synonyms for Santa Claus, the man who brings magic to children all over the world each year at Christmastime.

    Each year when the Letters to Santa start arriving at the Central Kentucky News-Journal's office, we are touched by the poignancy and trust expressed in these most personal of sentiments to Santa.

  • Our health is one thing that all of us are concerned about and sometimes take for granted. And when we're ill, we are privileged to be able to simply pick up the telephone and make an appointment to see a doctor.

    Our community is served by dozens of well-trained physicians and a top-notch hospital. At Taylor Regional Hospital, we have available to us the latest in specialized medical care.

    But in other countries people aren't so fortunate.

    That's why a recent medical mission trip to Ecuador is so special.

  • The Taylor County Fire Department has a new $25,000 grant available to help educate the public about fire protection. It may take every penny of it, too.

    In a totally unscientific survey of newspaper employees, 70 percent were not aware that County residents could pay voluntary annual fire dues.

  • Today is a day officially set aside as a time for gratitude. And those of us who live in Campbellsville and Taylor County have so much for which to be grateful.

    Most of us will sit down with family members and friends for a meal that can only be described as a feast. We can also be thankful that we have neighbors who will be there for those who don't have family and friends nearby or for those who don't have the resources to provide their own feasts.

  • It's Christmas and you ask your family to supply a list of things that they might like to receive as a gift. But instead of going by the list, you decide to buy your wife a gift so expensive that you can no longer afford anything for anyone else. To top it all off, what you bought your wife wasn't even on her list.

    Well, Merry Christmas Taylor County, you just received Cat Hollow Road.

    Magistrates last Tuesday earmarked a $200,000 expenditure that no one but them appears to covet.

  • I hope that Campbellsville goes forward with a smoking ordinance in public buildings. All businesses should be smoke-free for health reasons.

    Also smoking should not be around the outside of doors and entrances. Those who smoke should have consideration for those who don't because it has an impact on other people.

    Tommy Larimore

    Greensburg

  • Food and shelter are two things most of us never have to worry about. But not everyone is so lucky.

    A story in Monday's News-Journal about the problems Debbie Martin experienced drives home the point that homelessness isn't just a big-city problem. It can happen here. It's a real problem, and a solution isn't always easy.

    Luckily, Green River Ministries is trying to do something about homelessness - and just about every other opportunity to help humankind.

  • I don't know what it means for three area school systems asking for voter endorsement of a "recallable nickel" tax, but last week's ballot results on other issues would not seem to bode well for any measure that would require additional grit from taxpayers.

    If I had sewage laying on the surface of my back yard, I might feel a little differently about annexation than the majority of people in a South Campbellsville precinct who had an opportunity to do something about it.

    The message is, I think: People are not going to vote extra taxes (or expenses) on themselves.

  • Have you noticed lately a good many restaurants playing loud music on their intercom? That's hard to decipher. The other night my wife and I stopped at a favorite steakhouse for dinner. The music was so loud we left before ordering.

  • Today is Halloween. My 79-year-old father and my 76-year-old mother drove more than 600 miles from Missouri to take my children trick-or-treating. This is something they have done for many years, and each year we worry this will be the last year they will be able to make the trip.

    I rushed home today after work to help my children get into their costumes, only to find out that they had homework.

    Their summers have been shortened to almost nothing. Now you're taking Halloween away from them, too?

  • Plans are being made at this time to pursue a Campbellsville Residential Historic District nomination for historic properties in the Lebanon Avenue, Duffy Street, Jackson Street, High Street, North Central Avenue and Maple Street residential areas.

    The listing in the National Register provides recognition of the importance of a historic property, but it does not place any obligation or legal restriction on the use of the property by the owner.

  • It would be difficult to ever forget their faces ... faces I watched that day from behind the safe impersonality of my camera's lens.

    They were the faces of the families of our local Kentucky National Guard members who were leaving for Operation Enduring Freedom three years ago this month ... parents and grandparents ... children and spouses.

    The soldiers' faces were solemn and stoic. They were leaving to do their jobs. Their duty. But it was their families' faces that I remember best.

  • My name is Kyle Nappi. I am 17 years old and I live in Ostrander, Ohio. I was wondering if you could do me a favor.

    I have a big interest in history, specifically World War II. I collect military medals, patches, badges, insignia, field gear and a very unique thing, veterans' autographs. I have a scrapbook collection of autographs from military veterans who served during WWI, WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Gulf War and the present war in Iraq.

  • Watching our kids grow up, we always wonder what they will grow up to be. We try to help them, but eventually it will be their own decision. We can only hope and pray that they will make good choices as they get older.

    That brings me to Pfc. Montrell Durham. Montrell was a graduate of Campbellsville High School, where he played football. He liked playing, but as his father, I don't think he had the drive or motivation to be an outstanding player.

  • Several council members and I have been visiting with residents in the proposed annexation area this past week. Several good questions have been asked by the residents and I thought it may be useful to those who will be voting on this issue to know the questions and answers prior to the election:

    Will the school district change?

    No, the city and county school districts have nothing to do with the city limits.

    When will the sewer be installed?