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Opinion

  • Thanks to technology, our families will soon be safer.

    A new "One Call Now" program, already in use at some local schools, will notify us by telephone in the event of an emergency in Taylor County.

    The one-call system can send a pre-recorded message to as many as 5,000 phone numbers in a minute's time. In less than 10 minutes, all of Taylor County could be warned of an approaching storm.

  • Victims of domestic violence go to great lengths to protect their children. They do not want their children to be hurt and will voluntarily take a beating in order to keep their children from being hit.

    A mother's worst nightmare is to have her children become a victim of the violence.

  • Renewed public discourse about the advisability of lowering the legal drinking age, largely fueled by former Middlebury College President John M. McCardell Jr., has opened a different front in the war on substance use and abuse among young people.

    While some have tired of the now decades-old debate, a fresh round of honest discussion by informed public policy-makers and pundits can only inure to the benefit of those with the most at stake.

  • Ask anyone what comes to mind when they hear the words "Girl Scouts" and they're likely to say: "cookies."

    And they'd be right.

    But Girl Scouts are much more than just cookies. Just ask one.

    For nearly 100 years, Girl Scouting has helped to build girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place.

    According to the organization's Web site, Girl Scouting is the world's leading organization dedicated solely to girls where, in an accepting and nurturing environment, young ladies build character and skills for success in the real world.

  • In response to (The) Courier Journal's Dec. 17 trashing Interstate 66 and Kentucky as a whole ...

    The first time I ever heard of the "Road to Nowhere" was when Happy Chandler, running for governor in 1953, called Gov. Lawrence Wetherby's proposed Kentucky Turnpike from Louisville to Elizabethtown, the "Road that starts nowhere and ends nowhere." Today, what was the Kentucky Turnpike is now part of I-65, one of the busiest roads in Kentucky.

  • Thirteen may be an unlucky number for some, but for Campbellsville High, which hosted its 13th basketball tournament during the holiday break, it was another great run of basketball entertainment.

    Sixteen teams, three days, 24 games, 42 hours of basketball.

    The tournament committee led by Campbellsville High Coach Tim Davis, Athletics Director Jim Hardy and a host of volunteers did an excellent job of moving things along. Thirteen years is a good foundation for success.

  • Five hundred. That's the number of children whose Christmas prospects were improved this year because of Toys for Tots and Toys for Kids.

    We are a giving community, but we're also an active community with many active participants. All the giving in the world does not necessarily compute to a good project. But we're blessed to have a couple of great coordinators - Sharon Dobson at the fire departments and Denise Gupton at Rescue.

  • In about a hundred hours the calendar will flip to a new year - 2008. Almost hard to believe, isn't it?

    But as we move ahead, we know that promises can be a dime a dozen. The ones we make that are worth carrying through are as scarce as a hen's teeth. But that doesn't mean we shouldn't try.

    We may have a few personal things that we're going to resolve in 2008 - trim a few pounds, stop smoking, get right with God, rekindle a friendship, or be a better mom or dad.

  • And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be taxed.

    (And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.)

    And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

    And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David:)

  • It's a shame it's even necessary, but a recent purchase by the County makes good financial sense.

    Taylor Fiscal Court recently bought a $7,435 machine that will let County employees make road signs themselves rather than having to order them to help cut the cost.

    Last year alone, the County spent $8,900 on signs. With the new machine, hopefully that cost will decrease to the cost of supplies.

  • And we're off, to coin a popular Derby day refrain.

    Last Tuesday, Steve Beshear was inaugurated as Kentucky's new governor. Let's hope that Campbellsville and Taylor County are as well represented in what happens during the next four years as we were in Beshear's inaugural parade.

    Band members from Campbellsville and Taylor County high schools as well as the Campbellsville University Marching Tigers were a part of Tuesday's celebration.

    It's commendable that our small community had three groups invited to be a part of such a momentous occasion.

  • Someone once said: "The manner of giving is worth more than the gift."

    And around this community the hearts are always warmer than the dead-of-winter weather.

    The Holiday Helpline has ensured that nearly 400 families will have a better Christmas than they might have had otherwise. But the Helpline isn't taking credit. That credit belongs to the community - the one that is always so giving.

  • Jolly Old St. Nick. St. Nicholas. Mr. Claus. Ho Ho. All are synonyms for Santa Claus, the man who brings magic to children all over the world each year at Christmastime.

    Each year when the Letters to Santa start arriving at the Central Kentucky News-Journal's office, we are touched by the poignancy and trust expressed in these most personal of sentiments to Santa.

  • Our health is one thing that all of us are concerned about and sometimes take for granted. And when we're ill, we are privileged to be able to simply pick up the telephone and make an appointment to see a doctor.

    Our community is served by dozens of well-trained physicians and a top-notch hospital. At Taylor Regional Hospital, we have available to us the latest in specialized medical care.

    But in other countries people aren't so fortunate.

    That's why a recent medical mission trip to Ecuador is so special.

  • The Taylor County Fire Department has a new $25,000 grant available to help educate the public about fire protection. It may take every penny of it, too.

    In a totally unscientific survey of newspaper employees, 70 percent were not aware that County residents could pay voluntary annual fire dues.

  • Today is a day officially set aside as a time for gratitude. And those of us who live in Campbellsville and Taylor County have so much for which to be grateful.

    Most of us will sit down with family members and friends for a meal that can only be described as a feast. We can also be thankful that we have neighbors who will be there for those who don't have family and friends nearby or for those who don't have the resources to provide their own feasts.

  • It's Christmas and you ask your family to supply a list of things that they might like to receive as a gift. But instead of going by the list, you decide to buy your wife a gift so expensive that you can no longer afford anything for anyone else. To top it all off, what you bought your wife wasn't even on her list.

    Well, Merry Christmas Taylor County, you just received Cat Hollow Road.

    Magistrates last Tuesday earmarked a $200,000 expenditure that no one but them appears to covet.

  • I hope that Campbellsville goes forward with a smoking ordinance in public buildings. All businesses should be smoke-free for health reasons.

    Also smoking should not be around the outside of doors and entrances. Those who smoke should have consideration for those who don't because it has an impact on other people.

    Tommy Larimore

    Greensburg

  • Food and shelter are two things most of us never have to worry about. But not everyone is so lucky.

    A story in Monday's News-Journal about the problems Debbie Martin experienced drives home the point that homelessness isn't just a big-city problem. It can happen here. It's a real problem, and a solution isn't always easy.

    Luckily, Green River Ministries is trying to do something about homelessness - and just about every other opportunity to help humankind.

  • I don't know what it means for three area school systems asking for voter endorsement of a "recallable nickel" tax, but last week's ballot results on other issues would not seem to bode well for any measure that would require additional grit from taxpayers.

    If I had sewage laying on the surface of my back yard, I might feel a little differently about annexation than the majority of people in a South Campbellsville precinct who had an opportunity to do something about it.

    The message is, I think: People are not going to vote extra taxes (or expenses) on themselves.