.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • The American economy has enjoyed six straight years of uninterrupted growth. But recently, that growth appears to be slowing. In my travels across Kentucky, I've met many families who are uncertain about their economic future, and I felt Congress had to act.

    I'm glad to report that we did by passing a bipartisan economic-growth package that will act as a "booster shot" for our economy by providing fast tax relief to American taxpayers.

  • We all want to live a good long life. But let's be honest. We don't always take the care we should with our bodies. We don't eat right. We don't get enough exercise. We smoke.

    And that takes its toll on our bodies ... specifically, our hearts.

    Cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer in the U.S.

    And since 1963, each February has been declared as "American Heart Month" to help raise awareness of cardiovascular diseases.

    A story in last week's News-Journal told the story of two men who have had heart attacks - and successful recoveries.

  • No one likes to think of the community in which they live as facing a drug problem. But with the number of crimes committed in Taylor County that are reported in the News-Journal, the problem is a little difficult to ignore.

    And, after a few years, one begins to recognize the names that appear more frequently than others in court records.

    Defendants are traditionally given several chances to get their lives back on track. Judges typically try diversion and probation before prison time.

    But some people apparently won't learn without some additional prompting or help.

  • It's funny how far two dollars will go.

    For sports teams and other extracurricular groups at City Schools, it may not be how far $2 will take them but the psychological boost knowing they may not have to raise that much more just to participate for their school.

    In January, a Campbellsville Board of Education proposal was floated that traveling groups from City Schools would have to pay $3.86 a mile for bus travel.

  • For some reason, it always seems more difficult to fork over the money for necessities than it does for luxuries. It's much more pleasant to spend money going to the movies than paying the electric bill.

    But the electric bill is a necessity for all of us. And so is medicine.

    A story in Monday's News-Journal gave the details on local pharmacies' generic drug programs, programs that are going to save us all some money.

    Generic drugs, according to the FDA, are exactly the same as brand-name drugs. They just cost less.

  • Heading toward its 20th year, the Kentucky Lottery has certainly made its presence known in Taylor County. Last year alone, Taylor Countians bought $3.6 million in lottery tickets. That's an amazing amount of money.

    But at the same time, Taylor County has reaped benefits as well. Payback in prizes totaled $2.2 million, while $1.8 million was paid in college scholarships.

    At least we got back more than what we paid out.

    A story on today's front page details all the aspects of the Kentucky Lottery.

  • The collective whoops of approval in living rooms around Taylor County must have surely raised the community decibel level on Super Bowl Sunday.

    But it wasn't a football game we were juiced about.

    J.B. Holmes won his second FBR Open in Scottsdale, Ariz. about 20 minutes before the Giants-New England kickoff in Phoenix. That's when his 7-foot-long putt found the bottom of the cup and a gut-wrenching playoff victory over tour veteran Phil Mickelson.

    Way to go, J.B.!

  • A 13-year-old gets fouled on the basketball court by another student. In turn, later that evening, he sends a Myspace message to that student, saying, "You'd better watch out. I'll get you next time."

    Is that 13-year-old being a bully?

    One person might say yes, another might disagree. But who's right? And what, if anything, should be done about it?

  • "History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again."

    -From Maya Angelou's "On the Pulse of Morning"

    Beginning with today's issue and continuing through the month of February, the Central Kentucky News-Journal will be running a four-part series highlighting Campbellsville residents in honor of Black History Month.

  • A bill being proposed in the state legislature would require children to have a dental exam before starting school. Students today already must have a physical exam, an eye exam and up-to-date immunizations. And an addition such as this, while it could pose a hardship for some families, certainly makes sense.

    A similar bill was first proposed about seven years ago. Each year, however, it has gotten lost in the legislative process.

  • Tomorrow is the last day for candidates to file to run in the May 20 Primary Election.

    On a local basis, the ballot includes races for Campbellsville City Council and 51st District State Representative.

    The State Representative's race will be particularly interesting as incumbent Russ Mobley, a Republican, is not seeking re-election. Instead, two other Republicans - Russell Montgomery and Asa James Swan - have filed to run. No Democrat had filed papers as of press deadline for this edition.

  • We hear the words more often lately - budget cuts, recession, economic downturn. No one is sheltered from the ramifications - especially our government agencies that count on tax dollars to make ends meet.

    So, it comes as no real surprise that one of our school systems is looking at the possibility of raising the mileage fee it charges school groups for extracurricular trips.

    We can be relatively sure that there will be many more such proposals if budget cuts reach the level already being discussed in Frankfort.

    We don't have a problem with legitimate discussion.

  • Decades ago, Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. said to supporters of the civil rights movement in Washington, D.C., "... I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream. I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: 'We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal.'

  • Campbellsville and Taylor County were once again well represented at this past weekend's Kentucky Junior Miss program.

    Megan Romines made a Top 15 showing. Taylor County's junior misses always do well at the state program and this year was no exception.

    Megan, you should be proud of your accomplishments. We are. We congratulate you on your success and wish for you only more in the future.

  • "I'm warning you," Mom says. "This is the last time!"

    That idle threat is probably heard on a regular basis in every household from here to Timbuktu. But Taylor County magistrates heard something similar recently, and we certainly hope they'll really start to listen soon.

    Last November, magistrates voted to adopt a resolution recommended by the Court's Transportation Committee that the County no longer accept gravel roads into its road system - with the exception of three roads already in the process of being accepted.

  • Thanks to technology, our families will soon be safer.

    A new "One Call Now" program, already in use at some local schools, will notify us by telephone in the event of an emergency in Taylor County.

    The one-call system can send a pre-recorded message to as many as 5,000 phone numbers in a minute's time. In less than 10 minutes, all of Taylor County could be warned of an approaching storm.

  • Victims of domestic violence go to great lengths to protect their children. They do not want their children to be hurt and will voluntarily take a beating in order to keep their children from being hit.

    A mother's worst nightmare is to have her children become a victim of the violence.

  • Renewed public discourse about the advisability of lowering the legal drinking age, largely fueled by former Middlebury College President John M. McCardell Jr., has opened a different front in the war on substance use and abuse among young people.

    While some have tired of the now decades-old debate, a fresh round of honest discussion by informed public policy-makers and pundits can only inure to the benefit of those with the most at stake.

  • Ask anyone what comes to mind when they hear the words "Girl Scouts" and they're likely to say: "cookies."

    And they'd be right.

    But Girl Scouts are much more than just cookies. Just ask one.

    For nearly 100 years, Girl Scouting has helped to build girls of courage, confidence and character who make the world a better place.

    According to the organization's Web site, Girl Scouting is the world's leading organization dedicated solely to girls where, in an accepting and nurturing environment, young ladies build character and skills for success in the real world.

  • In response to (The) Courier Journal's Dec. 17 trashing Interstate 66 and Kentucky as a whole ...

    The first time I ever heard of the "Road to Nowhere" was when Happy Chandler, running for governor in 1953, called Gov. Lawrence Wetherby's proposed Kentucky Turnpike from Louisville to Elizabethtown, the "Road that starts nowhere and ends nowhere." Today, what was the Kentucky Turnpike is now part of I-65, one of the busiest roads in Kentucky.