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Opinion

  • Last month alone, 151,171 individuals across the nation filed for unemployment after being laid off from their jobs. And that number was down from June.

    This is certainly not good news for recent college graduates, as many have already learned firsthand that good jobs are hard to find.

    A story on today's front page illustrates the problem that just two recent graduates have faced: There are more people competing for fewer jobs.

  • As big a business as tourism has become in our community - $42.8 million in 2007 - it's important for us to put on a good show.

    And the show at Green River Lake is a major reason for our success. Whether it's fishing, water sports, camping or simply relaxing with friends, there's literally something for everyone to enjoy at the lake.

  • First, one notices the increased traffic. Then it's the busy parking lots. Those are two of the more obvious clues that Campbellsville University has begun a new semester and students from all over have arrived to make Campbellsville their temporary home.

    But there are other clues as well, some much less noticeable to the average person.

    With a fall semester enrollment of 2,405, there will be extra people to spend money in our stores, buy our gas, eat our food and attend our activities.

  • The cost of goods rose more than expected in July. Families are feeling the pinch as the cost of food, energy and clothing is going up and salaries are staying the same. Taxpayers cannot bear a heavier load in order to give the schools the added increase they need to operate - especially when our schools are not being fiscally responsible with the resources they already have.

  • We were expecting a big crowd at Tuesday night's Taylor County School Board meeting. Boy, were we surprised when no one showed up.

    We were as concerned as anyone when we learned about the "top story" on WHAS' Monday night news broadcast. A suspected problem with mold and mildew at Taylor County Elementary School making many children ill is certainly something parents need to know about.

  • This year's race for State Representative just became even more important.

    Citing a battle with cancer, Democrat Doug Mullins has dropped out of the 51st District race.

    Mullins, a current Campbellsville City Council member, ran unopposed in the May primary. He would have faced Republican John "Bam" Carney in the November General Election in an attempt to fill the term vacated by Russ Mobley, R-Campbellsville.

    Mobley will not seek re-election for health reasons.

  • In the last half-century, we've taken huge steps to ensure that all Americans get treated equally in the workplace. From the landmark civil rights legislation of the 1960s and onwards, fair hiring and pay regulations have allowed women and minorities to stand up for themselves and demand the equal treatment they deserve on the job.

    The impact of that progress has been tremendous. An entire generation of Americans understands that they have a right to fair and honest treatment on the job - a far cry from the days when women could be openly denied "men's jobs."

  • Report cards - you gotta love 'em. They keep parents informed about how well our children are doing in school. They also let us know the areas in which our children may need help.

    And good report cards are a sign that our schools are indeed teaching our children what they need to know in their journey to adulthood.

    A story on today's front page tells us about local results for the federal No Child Left Behind Act, which requires states to provide information on schools' and districts' progress toward proficiency by 2014.

  • There's a story on today's front page that describes just one of the many ways that some people take advantage of others.

    Technology is an excellent tool. But it can also lead to more - and even more advanced - ways that some people will be taken for a ride.

  • Just two weeks ago in this space, we opined about how property values in Kentucky were behind the nation - not only when it comes to increasing, but also when it comes to falling prices.

  • After two months of summer fun, it's time to get back to work. Yes, it's that time of year again - time for homework, research papers, tests, after-school activities, ball games and more.

    But it's also time for residents to be more careful in their daily travels.

    Classes begin today for students at Taylor County Schools and on Wednesday for Campbellsville and Kentucky Christian schools.

  • Our state has made a name for itself on more than one occasion. Kentucky is known for its family farms, its horses, its hospitality and more. However, there are several other issues that aren't quite as appealing.

    We lead the nation in the number of ATV deaths, prisoner growth and poor dental care. And, now, we're apparently leading many other, much larger cities in the amount of online gossip we participate in.

    Haven't we got anything better to do with our time?

  • Our state has made a name for itself on more than one occasion. Kentucky is known for its family farms, its horses, its hospitality and more. However, there are several other issues that aren't quite as appealing.

    We lead the nation in the number of ATV deaths, prisoner growth and poor dental care. And, now, we're apparently leading many other, much larger cities in the amount of online gossip we participate in.

    Haven't we got anything better to do with our time?

  • In just a few weeks, a group of energetic Campbellsville and Taylor County high school students will give Central Kentucky News-Journal readers a peek into the world of today's teenagers.

    The News-Journal's Teen Editorial Board will soon begin work on its fifth consecutive year of "Insight," a monthly teen page.

    Staff members at the News-Journal try to cover as much of our community as we can and we constantly ask for story ideas and information from our readers to help broaden our perspective. But we think the teen view would best be represented by teens themselves.

  • We guess we should say we're surprised. But we're not. Campbellsville is celebrating yet another Miss Kentucky title.

    Emily Cox was handed this year's crown over the weekend at the Singletary Center for the Arts on the University of Kentucky campus in Lexington. She is the fifth Miss Kentucky from Campbellsville and the second in her own family.

  • Ballard W. Cassady Jr.

    Kentucky Bankers Association

    On behalf of Kentucky's banking industry, and on behalf of the Kentucky Bankers Association's member banks and thrifts doing business in Kentucky, I want to take an opportunity to address consumer concerns and, hopefully, to alleviate fears and answer questions.

  • Sometimes it's good to take it slow. And we're not talking about dancing ... or ketchup.

    Kentucky has often been laughed at for being the stereotypical slow and backward state. People in larger cities have made fun of us for being "behind the times."

    Well, today's real estate market has proven that being slow is sometimes a good thing.

  • There have certainly been a lot of disturbing headlines in the news this political season, and much of it is coming not from TV, newspapers or the Internet, but from my own friends and neighbors. During the past year, I have personally heard the following things being said:

    "That Mormon could never be my president."

    "I don't think it's a woman's place to be president, but I'd rather vote for her than that other one."

    "Barrack Hussein Obama would surrender Iraq to Iran as the very first thing he would do. How can you doubt that?"

  • Economic development and tourism are two vital initiatives for any community. And because of that, agencies for both should work together to improve the appearance, opportunities and perceptions of our county.

    Tourism is what brings people to Taylor County. The Economic Development Authority brings industry, and with that comes jobs. Combine the two together ... and people can stay in our community permanently.

    It's a shame that there appears to be a tense working environment between the two. They should have open communication, especially working so close together.

  • Due to federal and state budget cuts, school boards are being forced to make tough decisions about which extracurricular activities will receive the greater portion of even smaller slices of the budgetary pie.

    And it's unfortunate for school leaders to be put in the position of forcing the programs to seek alternate forms of funding.