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Opinion

  • There's a story on today's front page that describes just one of the many ways that some people take advantage of others.

    Technology is an excellent tool. But it can also lead to more - and even more advanced - ways that some people will be taken for a ride.

  • Just two weeks ago in this space, we opined about how property values in Kentucky were behind the nation - not only when it comes to increasing, but also when it comes to falling prices.

  • After two months of summer fun, it's time to get back to work. Yes, it's that time of year again - time for homework, research papers, tests, after-school activities, ball games and more.

    But it's also time for residents to be more careful in their daily travels.

    Classes begin today for students at Taylor County Schools and on Wednesday for Campbellsville and Kentucky Christian schools.

  • Our state has made a name for itself on more than one occasion. Kentucky is known for its family farms, its horses, its hospitality and more. However, there are several other issues that aren't quite as appealing.

    We lead the nation in the number of ATV deaths, prisoner growth and poor dental care. And, now, we're apparently leading many other, much larger cities in the amount of online gossip we participate in.

    Haven't we got anything better to do with our time?

  • Our state has made a name for itself on more than one occasion. Kentucky is known for its family farms, its horses, its hospitality and more. However, there are several other issues that aren't quite as appealing.

    We lead the nation in the number of ATV deaths, prisoner growth and poor dental care. And, now, we're apparently leading many other, much larger cities in the amount of online gossip we participate in.

    Haven't we got anything better to do with our time?

  • In just a few weeks, a group of energetic Campbellsville and Taylor County high school students will give Central Kentucky News-Journal readers a peek into the world of today's teenagers.

    The News-Journal's Teen Editorial Board will soon begin work on its fifth consecutive year of "Insight," a monthly teen page.

    Staff members at the News-Journal try to cover as much of our community as we can and we constantly ask for story ideas and information from our readers to help broaden our perspective. But we think the teen view would best be represented by teens themselves.

  • We guess we should say we're surprised. But we're not. Campbellsville is celebrating yet another Miss Kentucky title.

    Emily Cox was handed this year's crown over the weekend at the Singletary Center for the Arts on the University of Kentucky campus in Lexington. She is the fifth Miss Kentucky from Campbellsville and the second in her own family.

  • Ballard W. Cassady Jr.

    Kentucky Bankers Association

    On behalf of Kentucky's banking industry, and on behalf of the Kentucky Bankers Association's member banks and thrifts doing business in Kentucky, I want to take an opportunity to address consumer concerns and, hopefully, to alleviate fears and answer questions.

  • Sometimes it's good to take it slow. And we're not talking about dancing ... or ketchup.

    Kentucky has often been laughed at for being the stereotypical slow and backward state. People in larger cities have made fun of us for being "behind the times."

    Well, today's real estate market has proven that being slow is sometimes a good thing.

  • There have certainly been a lot of disturbing headlines in the news this political season, and much of it is coming not from TV, newspapers or the Internet, but from my own friends and neighbors. During the past year, I have personally heard the following things being said:

    "That Mormon could never be my president."

    "I don't think it's a woman's place to be president, but I'd rather vote for her than that other one."

    "Barrack Hussein Obama would surrender Iraq to Iran as the very first thing he would do. How can you doubt that?"

  • Economic development and tourism are two vital initiatives for any community. And because of that, agencies for both should work together to improve the appearance, opportunities and perceptions of our county.

    Tourism is what brings people to Taylor County. The Economic Development Authority brings industry, and with that comes jobs. Combine the two together ... and people can stay in our community permanently.

    It's a shame that there appears to be a tense working environment between the two. They should have open communication, especially working so close together.

  • Due to federal and state budget cuts, school boards are being forced to make tough decisions about which extracurricular activities will receive the greater portion of even smaller slices of the budgetary pie.

    And it's unfortunate for school leaders to be put in the position of forcing the programs to seek alternate forms of funding.

  • Most of us could all agree that economic development is important to our community.

    Since Fruit of the Loom and Batesville Casket Co. abandoned our town a decade ago, we were left with picking up the pieces of what was left.

    But we picked up those pieces and have actually been able to diversify our local businesses, with the addition of Amazon.com and others.

  • Each year in June, the Central Kentucky News-Journal honors Taylor County men with a special section. The newspaper also asks for help from the community in choosing one man, in particular, who excels in his family, career, community and church.

    Residents send in their nominations for Taylor County Man of the Year and then a committee of News-Journal staff members chooses a winner based on those nominations.

    This year's honoree is Ben Martin.

    The decision was a difficult one for the judges. There were more than 10 different men nominated.

  • Tim Davis has coached the Kentucky All Stars to a split - and nearly a sweep - in their annual basketball all-star series vs. Indiana.

    Kentucky was in a tailspin, having lost eight straight and 18 of the last 20 before Davis guided them to a 95-78 blow-out win in Louisville on Sunday after dropping an 83-82 decision in Indianapolis the previous Friday.

  • Summertime. The word alone conjures up visions of ice cream, fishing, swimming, picnics ... and county fairs.

    Kentucky is famous for its county fairs. And now that it's back in full swing, the Taylor County Fair continues to get bigger and better.

    This past Saturday marked the first events for this year's fair - the annual Taylor County Youth Horse Show and Tommie Johns Memorial Championship Horse Show. Tomorrow, fairgoers will start with dairy and goat shows, and Saturday features a beef show and - new this year - a corn hole tournament.

  • Back to the Future. That's not just a movie title anymore. Now, apparently, it's going to be our voting system.

    As a story on last Thursday's front page explains, the County has approved the use of paper ballots for the November General Election. Federal money pays for voting machines, and counties can choose the system that works best for them.

    Taylor Fiscal Court has approved the purchase of machines that will scan paper ballots - ballots a lot like those we used years ago.

  • What has turned out to be a really good day for kids has also turned out to be a really good marketing tool for Taylor County and Green River Lake.

    Hundreds of kids (and with kids come parents) descended on Green River Lake on Saturday as the local chapter of the National Wild Turkey Federation sponsored its 2008 Kids Outdoor Day.

    It's almost an accomplishment of monumental proportions - coordinating activities on the waterfront, in the pavilion area at Green River Lake State Park and at Camp Kentahten. It was hot, but the kids didn't seem to mind.

  • This year's Relay for Life not only topped last year's fundraising total, organizers says it beat the group's goal by more than $6,000.

    Wow!

    Combined with more than $50,000 from the St. Baldrick's cancer fundraiser in March, the total Campbellsville and Taylor County has raised for cancer research is awesome.

    Cancer affects all of us in one way or another, whether it's through ourselves or a family member. It's up to all of us to support the effort to find a cure.

  • Cancer touches all of us, plain and simple. If only it was as simple to cure it.

    As the second leading cause of death in the U.S., cancer will affect all too many of us. We each have a risk - experts say half of all men and a third of all women will be diagnosed with some form of the disease.

    As scary as those numbers are, each year it seems as if cancer researchers have some good news for us.