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Opinion

  • Campbellsville University's homecoming celebration two weekends ago attracted more than 2,000 people to our community.

    From football to classic cars to pumpkin painting, CU offered many events for graduates, students and community members to enjoy.

    And much of it was free.

    At a time when money is tight, that's a plus for everyone.

    Our hats are off to CU homecoming organizers. We hope next year is even better.

  • Fall has to be my favorite time of year - the trees in Kentucky begin to take on a myriad of color and the cooler weather brings relief from summer's hazy days.

    But, by far, my favorite fall activity is watching college football, especially teams in the Southeastern Conference.

    I have mentioned in previous columns that I'm a Georgia Bulldog fan because I'm from Georgia. Though my football playing days were few growing up in south Georgia, I have always loved football.

  • Let me first say that it has been heartening to see communities across Kentucky pull together to help those in need following the devastating windstorm that swept across our state on Sept. 14.

    Families were put to the test with damaged homes, loss of power and in some cases, the loss of life. As Kentuckians so often do when faced with adversity, we responded with kindness, compassion and concern for our neighbors.

  • What it really comes down to is osmosis.You remember osmosis, don't you? In high school science, you learned that's the process that lets stuff pass through the membrane that surrounds your cells. Osmosis lets the good stuff in and the bad stuff out, trading spent fuel for new fuel. It keeps you alive.

    The funny thing about osmosis (other than the name) is that it's automatic. There's no conscious thought involved. That's why if you get stranded at sea, like Tom Hanks in Castaway, you mustn't drink seawater, even if you're dying of thirst.

  • This week, we are celebrating you. Sure, it's National Newspaper Week, and we're celebrating that. But because our pages are a chronicle of your lives, then, in fact, it's really you that we're celebrating.

    From births to deaths, scholarships to touchdowns, and golden anniversaries to taxes, each issue of the Central Kentucky News-Journal is a reflection of the milestones and happenings that the residents of our community experience.

    With each new baby born, with each new business opening, we celebrate those moments with you.

  • "Public notice." Sounds great, but it costs money ... at least in the print media. So why in the world should governmental entities spend taxpayers' money on public notices when they can post them on the Internet for next to nothing?

    Because the taxpayers have a right to know, have a need to know and want to know, that's why. The argument is as simple as that.

  • This weekend, alumni and friends of Campbellsville University will visit our community to celebrate CU's many accomplishments during homecoming.

    Those who haven't visited in a while will notice some changes. Just in the past few years, we've seen the addition of the E. Bruce Heilman Student Center, the School of Nursing, the Ransdell Chapel and Gosser Gymnasium. Next on the construction agenda is a new School of Business and Economics.

    But it's not just physical changes that are worth noting.

  • Regardless of who wins the presidential race on Nov. 4, history will be made. The U.S. will welcome either its first black president or first female vice president.

    Wouldn't you like to say you had a hand in making history?

    For those who haven't yet registered to vote, there is just one week left in which to do so. The deadline is Monday, Oct. 6. If you're registering at the Taylor County Clerk's office, you must do so before 4:30 p.m. Registration cards that are mailed in must be postmarked by Oct. 6.

  • Congress will never regain the faith of ordinary Americans until members of Congress win their trust. This appears to be a long way off.

    I see no other way to read the results of a recent poll by the Center on Congress at Indiana University. When it asked 1,000 people whether members of Congress are "honest people of good character," a rather stunning 42 percent said that most are not. Asked to grade Congress on holding its members to high ethical standards, 75 percent gave it either a D or an F.

  • More than 300 people from Taylor and surrounding counties participated in the 22nd annual Green River Lake Cleanup on Saturday morning. And, after about three hours of work, volunteers had filled a record amount of trash bags.

    The 301 boy and girl scouts, school children, church group members and other individuals are to be commended for the efforts Saturday. While the cleanup has seen more volunteers in the past, this year's group collected 40 more bags of trash than last year's now-shattered record of 178 bags.

  • Campbellsville is becoming a recognizable name.

    Over the years, we've had several young ladies from our community selected to represent our state at the Miss America pageant. We've also had our share of well-known coaches and authors.

    Now, however, after the success that Taylor County High graduate J.B. Holmes saw at this past weekend's Ryder Cup at Valhalla Country Club in Louisville, there's no stretching the fact that many will recognize the name of our town even more.

  • Congress continues to wrangle on measures to curb the alleged influence of speculators on oil prices. Republicans want to insert provisions on offshore and ANWR drilling, while Democrats prefer to focus on enlarging the regulatory powers of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

    However the political maneuvering turns out, cracking down on investors will only harm consumers. There is no hard evidence that speculation is responsible for high oil prices, and the proposed legislation would hamstring the beneficial role that futures markets play in our economy.

  • Fall is in the air. The evenings are getting chilly, children are planning their Halloween costumes and, before we know it, Christmas decorations will start appearing.

    But it's also a time for pride.

    October is "Roadside PRIDE Month" in southern and eastern Kentucky. Throughout October, residents will be picking up roadside litter and getting rid of items they no longer need.

    When children are told to clean up a mess, often their response is "... but I didn't do it." And, honestly, the rest of us often have a similar response.

  • It's more than "water cooler talk" or casual conversation these days.

    The price of gas is affecting our everyday lives.

    It's hard for most of us to drive past a gas station without at least a casual glance at the price sign. And oftentimes that glance is more than just casual.

    Last Friday, stories about increasing gas prices were buzzing about, with projections as high as $4.50 or $5 a gallon.

    One common thread in nearly all the stories: Why?

  • Trey Grayson

    Secretary of State

    When our founding fathers emerged from the Constitutional Convention in 1789, they gave America the principles that continue to guide us to the present. Not only does the Constitution guide American democracy, but it is the longest lasting constitution in human history and has served as an inspiration for democratic constitutions around the world.

  • Many of us can remember listening to Everette Lee, one of the founders of Campbellsville's Fourth of July Celebration, remark on Main Street during opening ceremonies: "They're one of ours," when introducing someone being honored.

    That phrase could not be any more evident than when John "J.B." Holmes plays for the United States during the 37th Ryder Cup this week at Valhalla.

  • "A good book is the best of friends, the same today and for ever." -Martin Farquhar Tupper (1810-1889)

    We're excited! Woody, the Kentucky Wiener dog is back. And starting next week, children in Campbellsville and Taylor County can follow along through 10 weeks of his misadventures.

  • According to recent news reports, a 69-year-old Louisville woman attempted to secure a domestic violence order against her 68-year-old husband. However, Judge Joseph O'Reilly determined that he "did not find the burden of proof that violence occurred," and did not issue the order. This was on Aug. 20. On Aug. 25, Dorene Seidl was shot to death allegedly by her husband as she attempted to retrieve belongings from her home.

  • As much as we would wish that every baby is born healthy, life doesn't always happen like that. That's why organizations such as the March of Dimes are so important.

    The March of Dimes is a nonprofit health organization that works to give all babies a chance. Beginning with its founding in 1938 and the subsequent development of a vaccine to eliminate polio, the March of Dimes has saved the lives of millions of babies over the past 70 years.

  • The Campbellsville National Guard unit has been activated once again. This time, however, it's not for war, thank goodness.

    When we've written stories in the past about our local unit being activated, it's always been with an aspect of concern for their welfare as they travel overseas to fight the war against terror.

    Now, it's others' welfare that's the concern.