.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Opinion

  • Congress continues to wrangle on measures to curb the alleged influence of speculators on oil prices. Republicans want to insert provisions on offshore and ANWR drilling, while Democrats prefer to focus on enlarging the regulatory powers of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission.

    However the political maneuvering turns out, cracking down on investors will only harm consumers. There is no hard evidence that speculation is responsible for high oil prices, and the proposed legislation would hamstring the beneficial role that futures markets play in our economy.

  • Fall is in the air. The evenings are getting chilly, children are planning their Halloween costumes and, before we know it, Christmas decorations will start appearing.

    But it's also a time for pride.

    October is "Roadside PRIDE Month" in southern and eastern Kentucky. Throughout October, residents will be picking up roadside litter and getting rid of items they no longer need.

    When children are told to clean up a mess, often their response is "... but I didn't do it." And, honestly, the rest of us often have a similar response.

  • It's more than "water cooler talk" or casual conversation these days.

    The price of gas is affecting our everyday lives.

    It's hard for most of us to drive past a gas station without at least a casual glance at the price sign. And oftentimes that glance is more than just casual.

    Last Friday, stories about increasing gas prices were buzzing about, with projections as high as $4.50 or $5 a gallon.

    One common thread in nearly all the stories: Why?

  • Trey Grayson

    Secretary of State

    When our founding fathers emerged from the Constitutional Convention in 1789, they gave America the principles that continue to guide us to the present. Not only does the Constitution guide American democracy, but it is the longest lasting constitution in human history and has served as an inspiration for democratic constitutions around the world.

  • Many of us can remember listening to Everette Lee, one of the founders of Campbellsville's Fourth of July Celebration, remark on Main Street during opening ceremonies: "They're one of ours," when introducing someone being honored.

    That phrase could not be any more evident than when John "J.B." Holmes plays for the United States during the 37th Ryder Cup this week at Valhalla.

  • "A good book is the best of friends, the same today and for ever." -Martin Farquhar Tupper (1810-1889)

    We're excited! Woody, the Kentucky Wiener dog is back. And starting next week, children in Campbellsville and Taylor County can follow along through 10 weeks of his misadventures.

  • According to recent news reports, a 69-year-old Louisville woman attempted to secure a domestic violence order against her 68-year-old husband. However, Judge Joseph O'Reilly determined that he "did not find the burden of proof that violence occurred," and did not issue the order. This was on Aug. 20. On Aug. 25, Dorene Seidl was shot to death allegedly by her husband as she attempted to retrieve belongings from her home.

  • As much as we would wish that every baby is born healthy, life doesn't always happen like that. That's why organizations such as the March of Dimes are so important.

    The March of Dimes is a nonprofit health organization that works to give all babies a chance. Beginning with its founding in 1938 and the subsequent development of a vaccine to eliminate polio, the March of Dimes has saved the lives of millions of babies over the past 70 years.

  • The Campbellsville National Guard unit has been activated once again. This time, however, it's not for war, thank goodness.

    When we've written stories in the past about our local unit being activated, it's always been with an aspect of concern for their welfare as they travel overseas to fight the war against terror.

    Now, it's others' welfare that's the concern.

  • Rarely, if ever, has an election captured global attention like this one. The race for the White House is a topic of conversation at dinner tables, in marketplaces and halls of worship and on news broadcasts around the world. Democracy is on full display, and the message is hopeful, forward-looking and bright.

    Here at home, the historic nature of this election is inspiring a kind of democratic renaissance. Registration and turnout are expected to reach historic highs.

  • Pro-ac-tive (adj): Acting in advance to deal with an expected difficulty; anticipatory.

    The horror story on today's front page about identity theft is an infomercial for the word "proactive."

    There will always be those who take advantage of others, and it appears to be getting easier to do in this technologically advanced age we live in today.

    That's why it's up to us to be proactive. It's a whole lot easier to take preventive steps rather than to take action after the fact.

  • Last month alone, 151,171 individuals across the nation filed for unemployment after being laid off from their jobs. And that number was down from June.

    This is certainly not good news for recent college graduates, as many have already learned firsthand that good jobs are hard to find.

    A story on today's front page illustrates the problem that just two recent graduates have faced: There are more people competing for fewer jobs.

  • As big a business as tourism has become in our community - $42.8 million in 2007 - it's important for us to put on a good show.

    And the show at Green River Lake is a major reason for our success. Whether it's fishing, water sports, camping or simply relaxing with friends, there's literally something for everyone to enjoy at the lake.

  • First, one notices the increased traffic. Then it's the busy parking lots. Those are two of the more obvious clues that Campbellsville University has begun a new semester and students from all over have arrived to make Campbellsville their temporary home.

    But there are other clues as well, some much less noticeable to the average person.

    With a fall semester enrollment of 2,405, there will be extra people to spend money in our stores, buy our gas, eat our food and attend our activities.

  • The cost of goods rose more than expected in July. Families are feeling the pinch as the cost of food, energy and clothing is going up and salaries are staying the same. Taxpayers cannot bear a heavier load in order to give the schools the added increase they need to operate - especially when our schools are not being fiscally responsible with the resources they already have.

  • We were expecting a big crowd at Tuesday night's Taylor County School Board meeting. Boy, were we surprised when no one showed up.

    We were as concerned as anyone when we learned about the "top story" on WHAS' Monday night news broadcast. A suspected problem with mold and mildew at Taylor County Elementary School making many children ill is certainly something parents need to know about.

  • This year's race for State Representative just became even more important.

    Citing a battle with cancer, Democrat Doug Mullins has dropped out of the 51st District race.

    Mullins, a current Campbellsville City Council member, ran unopposed in the May primary. He would have faced Republican John "Bam" Carney in the November General Election in an attempt to fill the term vacated by Russ Mobley, R-Campbellsville.

    Mobley will not seek re-election for health reasons.

  • In the last half-century, we've taken huge steps to ensure that all Americans get treated equally in the workplace. From the landmark civil rights legislation of the 1960s and onwards, fair hiring and pay regulations have allowed women and minorities to stand up for themselves and demand the equal treatment they deserve on the job.

    The impact of that progress has been tremendous. An entire generation of Americans understands that they have a right to fair and honest treatment on the job - a far cry from the days when women could be openly denied "men's jobs."

  • Report cards - you gotta love 'em. They keep parents informed about how well our children are doing in school. They also let us know the areas in which our children may need help.

    And good report cards are a sign that our schools are indeed teaching our children what they need to know in their journey to adulthood.

    A story on today's front page tells us about local results for the federal No Child Left Behind Act, which requires states to provide information on schools' and districts' progress toward proficiency by 2014.

  • There's a story on today's front page that describes just one of the many ways that some people take advantage of others.

    Technology is an excellent tool. But it can also lead to more - and even more advanced - ways that some people will be taken for a ride.