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Opinion

  • Ginger Colvin has been to the NAIA Division 1 Women's Basketball Championship in Jackson, Tenn. as a Campbellsville University player and as an assistant coach.

    Today, she will be guiding her first squad as head coach when the Lady Tigers battle Columbia (Mo.) at 10 a.m. ET.

    This will be the 17th national appearance for the Lady Tigers in basketball, the first 16 coming under the direction of NAIA Hall of Fame coach Donna Wise.

    Good luck. We'll be watching.

     

  • Commonwealth Cleanup Week starts Sunday. Have you made your plans to help?

    Commonwealth Cleanup Week is an annual weeklong event geared toward cleaning up Kentucky's communities. And all across the state, groups are gearing up to clean roadsides and parks in their communities.

    Last year, more than 5,151 people participated in the statewide event, picking up 14,860 bags of trash along 1,846 miles of roadway and cleaning up 26 dumps statewide. Participants also collected and recycled 337 appliances and 3,956 tires.

  • Taylor County Fiscal Court's Budget, Audits and Personnel Committee recently concluded that the 2009-2010 jail budget funding will fall about $600,000 short of needed revenue. There are a lot of factors that have led to this situation and are, at this point in time, really not relevant.

    What is important is how the shortfall is addressed.

    Suggestions that have arisen include: raising the occupational tax rate, adding an insurance premium tax, adding a sunset tax and even breaking the occupational tax agreement with the City.

  • Whether it's through a parent, a spouse, a child, a grandparent, a friend, or even ourselves, cancer will reach out its deadly hand and touch us all. And that's why we should all be concerned with research into its cure.

    What may have killed us 50, 20 or even just a few years ago, is now treatable - thanks to research.

    And that's what gives us hope.

    As the second leading cause of the death in the U.S., cancer will affect all too many of us. We each have a risk - experts say half of all men and a third of all women will be diagnosed with some form of the disease.

  • There’s an old saying, “If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is.” That’s sound advice for almost any situation and should become the official motto for modern times.

    Local police say that with the economy on the downward slide, scams are on the upswing. And they’re hitting home.

  • Change can be a good thing. At least sometimes.

    Changing the look of downtown Campbellsville is definitely a good thing. We can’t help but wonder if a few of the changes planned for streetscape and beautification don’t necessarily fall into the “sometimes” category.

    New, handicapped-accessible sidewalks and walking paths are definitely a plus. Closing the main entrance to the library parking lot, though, we’re not as sure about.

  • The ABC documentary “A Hidden America: Children of the Mountains” and its short follow-up stirred a lot of talk in Central Appalachia this month. But what action will ensue? That is the question the people of the region, and their journalists, need to answer.

     

  • Did you know there are math problems in today's newspaper? What about a language arts quiz? Or a science or social studies project in the making?

    Well, local teachers have known this for years. That's why many are firm believers in the Newspapers In Education program, a worldwide initiative that promotes the use of newspapers in the classroom.

    Educators say using the newspaper in their classrooms provides a real-world connection that is motivating and adds real-life dimension to their classrooms.

  • It has to be difficult to move to a new country, and even worse when you don't speak the language.

    That's why programs in place at local public schools - and at Campbellsville University - are so important.

    If any of you have ever visited another country where you didn't know the language, then you know at least part of what we're talking about. Now, imagine moving to live in that country.

  • Report cards - they're either dreaded or anticipated. They keep us as parents informed about how well our children are doing in school. And good report cards are a sign that our schools are teaching our children what they need to know in their journey to adulthood.

    A story on today's front page explains our local schools' report cards, which provide information on schools' and districts' progress. All Kentucky students are expected to reach "proficiency" - or scores of 100 on state tests - by the year 2014. And that's not too far off in our future.

  • “History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again.”

    — From Maya Angelou’s “On the Pulse of Morning”

    If you’re not a regular subscriber, you may have missed the beginning of our annual four-part series in honor of Black History Month.

  • "I wish you shelter from the storm

    And a cozy fire to keep you warm

    And most of all

    When snowflakes fall

    I wish you love."

    -Albert A. Beach

    English lyrics

    Love is in the air ... and in our newspaper pages.

    Between Valentine's Day this Saturday, the winning love letters on today's front page, a story about the Happiness and Opportunity through Marriage Education program, or H.O.M.E., and the Bridal Feature on page 8A, we're celebrating love.

  • Do you have a mailbox? If so, there's a proposal before Congress right now that could affect you.

    Postmaster General John E. Potter has asked Congress to lift a federal mandate requiring six-day mail delivery. Apparently, the United States Postal Service is facing a loss this year of as much as $6 billion.

    And this is their attempt to save money.

  • As difficult and inconvenient as the past week has been for many residents of Taylor County, it has been an enlightening week as well.

    With the ice storm of last Tuesday - and then the inch and a half of snow that followed the very next day - more than half a million people across the state lost electricity. Though Taylor County didn't get the worst of what Mother Nature had to offer, we still had thousands without electricity and heat.

  • Editor's Note: This editorial first appeared in the Casey County News on Wednesday, Jan. 28.

    One of the provisions in the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution states that citizens have the right to a free press.

    And that means a press unencumbered by the dictates of a local, state or federal government deciding what can be printed or broadcast.

    However, one state legislator wants to limit access to 911 recordings because the recordings, in his opinion, are being used by media companies to attract viewers and boost ratings.

  • In today's newspaper, readers will notice a new addition. It's called Success Stories. And each month throughout the year, a new Success feature will be published.

    The feature stories are written by the news staff to run simultaneously with advertisements purchased by those businesses that choose to participate. The businesses listed in the advertisements at the bottom of the "Success" page will be featured in the upcoming months' stories.

  • What do these numbers mean to you ... 4, 4, 13, 7, 6 and 8? Any idea? If one adds them together, the total is 42. But they're more than just numbers. They're lives.

    Forty-two is the number of people who lost their lives in car crashes in Taylor County over the past six years.

    That's 42 people who left loved ones behind involuntarily ... unexpectedly. And those 42 are mourned by many, many more.

  • Emily Cox, the reigning Miss Kentucky, made her hometown proud on Saturday night by making the Miss America pageant's Top 12.

    To top that off, Cox won a preliminary award before the pageant even began.

    Cox's work with her platform - "Uniquely Me: Promoting Self-Esteem in Adolescent Girls" - earned her the Quality of Life Award. She will receive a $6,000 scholarship.

  • The right to breathe clean air should take precedence over the right to smoke, simply because smoking endangers others' health.

    And that's why we believe a smoking ban in all public buildings is needed.

    There have been attempts in the past to ban smoking in restaurants. But why stop there?

    If one has a right to eat in a smoke-free building, why shouldn't one have a right to conduct other business in a smoke-free place as well?

  • Tomorrow, as the 44th President of the United States places his hand on the very same Bible that former President Abraham Lincoln did so many years ago, history will be made.

    Record crowds are expected to watch the inauguration of President Barack Obama, both in person and on television news channels.

    And several of those on hand for the personal experience will be representing Campbellsville. We can’t help but wonder how many communities our size will be represented at such a historic occasion. Few, we would assume.