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Opinion

  • Summer break is officially over. It's time once again to hit the schoolbooks, trading in those lazy days for homework assignments, research papers and tests.

    And it's also time for the rest of us to be more careful in our daily travels.

    Classes begin Wednesday for students at Campbellsville, Taylor County and Kentucky Christian schools.

  • After three years' hiatus, the Campbellsville Marching Eagles are back, and we're glad to see it.

    Band teaches kids more than just music. Marching band is about teamwork and dedication, the same as other extracurricular groups. Sports aren't for all kids, which is why band is an important addition to any school's list of activities.

    We wish you luck, Marching Eagles, and we'll be watching!

     

  • Tight financial situations seem to generate action in many different forms. Some of us cut back on our budgets, others get second jobs to make more money.

    In years past, tax money was enough for local governments to provide needed services. A decade ago, however, City and County governments decided that they needed more money to operate and instituted a 1 percent countywide occupational tax, with proceeds split between the two agencies.

    However, the first of this month, the two governments decided to go their own way, and now each agency has its own 1 percent tax.

  • If you read Monday's newspaper, you read a story about the increased development in the downtown area.

    Just take a drive down Main Street in Campbellsville ... talk about progress.

    From new specialty stores and restaurants to residential apartments and the nearly complete judicial center, downtown Campbellsville truly is booming ... at least during the daytime hours.

    We're hoping that some plans are under way that will extend that boom to the evening hours.

  • Sixty-three cents. That’s the best deal going these days.

    For each day a Taylor County Detention Center inmate works in our community, that’s how much it costs taxpayers.

    Inmate labor isn't new to our community - inmates have cleaned our roads for several years. But now inmates can help rescue and fire personnel with the duties that often go overlooked when there are not enough hours in the day.

  • The headline says it all. For those of you who took the time to enjoy at least some of the multitude of events scheduled as part of this year's Fourth of July Celebration, we know you were as impressed as we were.

    Friday activities have picked up in abundance - and popularity - and a large crowd enjoyed what Main Street had to offer. Having the K-Country Showdown on Main also seemed to be a popular addition.

    The weather cooperated for much of the day on Saturday, and shortly after 7 that morning several hot air balloons took to the skies.

  • There's nothing like a good book, and the Taylor County Public Library tries to keep that idea alive, even during the hot, lazy months of summer.

    Each year, the library participates in a statewide summer reading program sponsored by the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives. This year the theme was "Be Creative @ Your Library."

    The free program is for children of all ages. Those who participate also receive free coupons for various statewide attractions.

  • We will celebrate our nation's independence on Saturday with a celebration the likes of which most communities only dream about.

    A story on today's front page gives all the details and there's a schedule of events we can clip out and take with us so we don't miss any of the exciting activities planned.

    Then, on Saturday night, the annual fireworks show will attract thousands to the Miller Park area.

    Fireworks are an American summertime tradition, especially around the Fourth of July. But, unfortunately, so are fireworks injuries.

  • Summer always seems to be a time of blood shortages, and this year is no exception.

    Students in high school, college and university make up about 20 percent of the River Valley Region's blood collection. With most students on summer recess, blood centers across the state are facing even more challenge to keep up their supplies.

    Summer is also the time when people take vacations and spend time doing other outdoor activities, oftentimes not taking the time to give blood as they normally might.

  • Each year in June, the Central Kentucky News-Journal celebrates Taylor County men with a special section. The newspaper also asks for help from the community in choosing one man, in particular, who has excelled in his family, career, community and church during the past year.

    Residents send in their nominations for Taylor County Man of the Year and then a committee of News-Journal staff and others meets to consider those nominations as well as others in the community.

  • "Anyone can be a father, but it takes someone special to be a Dad."

    Maybe he read bedtime stories, planned a fishing trip or took us to that special ball game. Perhaps he helped with the dreaded algebra homework or set that curfew we didn't always agree with.

    Or maybe he has lent advice or encouragement as we have become parents ourselves.

    For all those things, now is the time to give thanks.

    Sunday is Father's Day, and we all should set aside some time to do just that.

  • There’s just something about competition that brings out the worst in some people.

    Whether it’s a kids’ ball game, a school award or a beauty pageant, all too many times adults embarrass themselves in front of their children.

    We sign our children up for sports teams so they can learn how to play the game from coaches. Then we yell directions from the sidelines ourselves and complain about the very people we have asked to teach our children sportsmanship and skills?

  • Everyone has opinions. We express ours quite often in this very space.

    But opinions mean nothing if they are not shared. And right now, ideas are needed.

    On June 15, state lawmakers will reconvene in Frankfort to address a projected budget deficit of $1 billion. The governor has a plan to cut $200 million, a plan some lawmakers say will actually gain plenty of support on House and Senate floors. He's also added the possibility of slot machines at Kentucky racetracks to the agenda.

    This doesn't mean the problem is solved.

  • So many times, we hear complaints that there's nothing to do. Well, that's certainly not the case this coming weekend. As a matter of fact, we doubt any one person could attend ALL the events that are happening.

    Starting tonight, there are opportunities to volunteer with the Crusade for Children door-to-door fundraising each evening and help with roadblocks during the coming weekend.

  • Firefighters live their lives on call, hoping they're never needed. But just after 5 a.m. Tuesday, they got the call they probably hoped they'd never receive.

    A fire at the former Fruit of the Loom plant destroyed a warehouse there. And, boy, was it a doozy. The fire was so huge, it took all our local firefighters plus those from surrounding counties hours to contain it.

    There's probably nothing being discussed more in our community this week than the fire.

  • We've said it before. But we think it's time to say it again. The right to breathe clean air should take precedence over the right to smoke.

    Just prior to tonight's Campbellsville City Council meeting, there will be a public hearing on the issue of a smoking ban in public buildings. That will be followed by a vote of the Council.

    Such a ban simply makes sense ... because smoking endangers others' health.

  • Firefighters in the Campbellsville and Taylor County fire departments and their many volunteers will begin collecting for the Crusade for Children fundraising campaign next week.

    For the past few years, volunteers have conducted door-to-door collections in a different segment of the county each night in an attempt to reach all households. Those collections start Monday evening and continue through Thursday evening.

    In addition, roadblocks are held at major intersections throughout the community on Friday and Saturday and near the fire department on Sunday morning.

  • "It is only the ignorant who despise education."

    -Publius Syrus (42 B.C.)

    Knowledge. Education. Learning. Growth. No matter how old we get, learning is imperative. One can never learn enough.

    Each of us learns something new every single day. Sure, it might not be as complicated as a foreign language, physics or calculus. It may just be a new neighbor’s name or that the price of gas dropped a penny.

  • Fifth Region Tournament appearances are a common occurrence for Campbellsville's and Taylor County's baseball teams and the Lady Cardinal softball squad.

    This year will be no different as the 20th District Tourney baseball title resides in this county for the 20th consecutive season after the Eagles conquered the Cardinals on Wednesday.

  • While Veterans Day is the day set aside to thank and honor all those among us who have served their country, Memorial Day is a day set aside to remember and honor those who gave the ultimate service to their country.

    Today is that day.

    And we hope you have plans to attend this afternoon's Memorial Day ceremony at the Taylor County War Memorial at 2 p.m.

    It takes a special kind of person to be willing to fight for their country, knowing that it could cost their life. And it takes a special family to support that loved one in their determination to serve.