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Opinion

  • In today's issue, readers will see five pages devoted to National Business Women's Week in October.

    On these pages, there are advertisements in honor of local women in business as well as feature stories about three Taylor County women who do their best to contribute to their community.

    This year's stories are about Linda Clark, Jane Wheatley and Karen Patton. Clark owns her own catering business, Wheatley is CEO at Taylor Regional Hospital and Patton renovated a building in downtown and started a day spa and salon.

  • So far this year, police have responded to 172 domestic violence calls in Taylor County. We are only 288 days into this year, which means that police have visited local homes for this one single reason entirely too many times.

    And that’s sad.

    October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, when all of us need to sit up and take notice of the sad state of our society in which people abuse the very ones they profess to love.

    Also during this month, officials try their best to get the word out that it doesn’t have to be this way.

  • Maybe you saw that National Football League players wore pink shoes, pink gloves, pink wristbands and carried pink towels this past week. Major League Baseball players brought pink bats to the plate on Mother's Day. All this is an effort to bring awareness to breast cancer.

  • Humanity is diverse. We need only look around us to see that. And it's our differences that make us unique.

    Unfortunately, all too often some focus on those differences and use them to keep people apart, rather than using them to bring us together.

    Just because we don't believe as someone else does, just because we might dress differently, just because we might speak a different language or just because we might have a different color skin - none of that makes one person any better than another.

  • The Central Kentucky News-Journal is your community newspaper. As such, we focus mainly on issues and events that happen in Taylor County.

    That's not to say we won't write about other nationwide or even worldwide issues, but those stories will be written with an emphasis on how they affect those of us who live in Taylor County.

    With the limited resources we have at our small newspaper, we usually can't touch those complicated investigative stories such as the nationwide economy or the current health care debate.

  • We just don't get it.

    Several in the community have said they're upset that the City bought a new ladder truck for the fire department.

    Did not everyone in town see the fire at the former Fruit of the Loom building? We should be grateful that Adair County had its own — and didn't mind helping us.

    Not even counting that building, we've got Jackson Tower, the new Judicial Center, the courthouse, several motels, Main Street businesses, local schools and other buildings that are tall enough that a ladder truck would be essential in fighting a fire.

  • It's all too easy to become complacent when we're doing something that's second nature to us.

    Accidents most often happen when we're doing something we've done hundreds - if not thousands - of times before.

    But when it comes to farming, that can be especially dangerous.

    According to the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety, farmers face a variety of hazardous environmental factors. Weather, terrain and atmospheric conditions all present a host of hazards and risks to agricultural workers.

  • "A good book is the best of friends, the same today and for ever."

    —Martin Farquhar Tupper

    We're excited! Woody, the Kentucky Wiener dog is back. And starting today, children in Campbellsville and Taylor County can follow along through 10 weeks of his adventures - and MISadventures!

  • The image a community portrays has much to do with how it's perceived by others. And a neat, clean, well cared for community will attract visitors — and keep them coming back.

    Green River Lake has much to do with our community's attractiveness.

    Whether it's fishing, water sports, camping or simply relaxing with friends, there's literally something for everyone to enjoy at the lake. There are also several miles of trails for hikers, bikers and horseback riders.

    But if those areas are used as a dumping ground for garbage, why would anyone want to visit?

  • It has been said many times that there's little to do in Campbellsville.

    Two weekends ago, there was something for everyone ... from shopping for bargains at the annual Tebbs Bend Flea Market to catching some fish at the Green River Lake Kids' Fishing Derby to going on a hayride at the Fall Heritage Festival at The Homeplace on Green River.

    And the best part about it all ... the majority of it was free.

    Our hats are off to those who organized last weekend's events, which attracted more than 1,000 people to the area.

  • We're having trouble getting it. On today's Opinion page, you will see the remarks made by President Barack Obama to American's schoolchildren on Tuesday.

    He talks about responsibility to one's self, the importance of education, hard work, opportunities, responding to challenges, commitment, success, strength and courage.

    Why would anyone object to a child hearing such words of encouragement?

  • The Kentucky State Fair is a showcase for what Kentucky has to offer. That's why we were disappointed to find that Taylor County wasn't represented in the "Pride of the Counties" display.

    The Tourism Commission and Chamber of Commerce boards of directors elected not to participate this year. And neither City nor County governments nor any other local agency chose to pick up the ball.

  • Keeping our history alive. That's what it's all about.

    The biennial Durham High Reunion is a wonderful time to reflect on where we have been and where we're headed.

    We think it's great that those who attended Durham High School care enough about their heritage to get together every other year for a reunion.

    It takes a lot of time and effort to plan such an event, and those who participate should be commended.

  • Taylor County has been blessed with regard to the arts.

    The Central Kentucky Arts Series and Campbellsville University already provide many unique opportunities. And, now, the annual Music in the Park concert series is kicking off its new year.

    Sponsored by Greater Campbellsville United, the City of Campbellsville and Taylor Fiscal Court, Music in the Park brings a series of free musical performances to Miller Park's amphitheater on Fridays in September.

    And each week features a different type of music.

  • Many little girls grow up looking forward to their chance to participate in the annual Junior Miss program.

    This year, 21 young women participated in the 2010 Taylor County Junior Miss program. Their performances were outstanding - off stage as well as on stage. Throughout the summer, the girls spent hours practicing and working on the program. They also participated in community service projects.

    That kind of sportsmanship is needed in all areas of life.

  • Seems that when we elect public officials to serve our interests, they should at least make an attempt to do so.

    For the third time this year, several Campbellsville City Council members have not shown up for a significant vote.

    At last week's Council meeting, during which the annual property tax rate was set, Members Sharon Hoskins, Paul Harmon, Stan McKinney, Randy Herron and Sue Smith voted to keep the same rate as last year. Council Members Richard Jeter and Vangie Ford cast the lone "no" votes.

  • Now with four confirmed cases of the N1H1 flu virus in our community, some might think it's time to panic. But there's no reason to if we take the proper precautions.

    All of those who have had the illness have been treated and are now well, according to Amy C. Tomlinson, public health services coordinator with the Lake Cumberland District Health Department in Somerset, and, to the best of their knowledge, the illness hasn't spread to our local schools.

    Tomlinson says she wants to be very open about the confirmed cases to help ensure that everyone knows the facts.

  • It's pretty special when a young man completes the requirements necessary to become an Eagle Scout. Such an honor shows the commitment, perseverance and dedication necessary to achieve such a feat.

    But to have an entire troop earn the Eagle Scout honor ... we are very much impressed.

    A story on today's front page details just such an occurrence. If you see these young men out in the community - or their parents or troop leaders - congratulate them for a job well done.

     

  • In today's paper, readers will find a special section that includes the fall schedules for local sports teams and marching bands.

    Whether we wear Cardinal red, Eagle purple or Tiger maroon, it's important for us to support these young men and women as they represent us in competitions against other communities' teams.

    We hope that parents, as well as community members, will support these students as they practice for hours on end in their attempts to represent our community well.

  • Magistrates are considering an ordinance that would address the issue of speed limits on county roads - and we're all in favor of it.

    There have been issues with speeds limits in the county for several years now.

    In April 2007, Taylor Fiscal Court agreed to set fines to accompany the County's speed limit ordinances. Sheriff John Shipp told magistrates that there was no punishment for someone who violated county speed limits. Sure, the fines set by the Court weren't too stiff but, hopefully, they at least gave drivers another reason to slow down.