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Opinion

  • Many little girls grow up looking forward to their chance to participate in the annual Junior Miss program.

    This year, 21 young women participated in the 2010 Taylor County Junior Miss program. Their performances were outstanding - off stage as well as on stage. Throughout the summer, the girls spent hours practicing and working on the program. They also participated in community service projects.

    That kind of sportsmanship is needed in all areas of life.

  • Seems that when we elect public officials to serve our interests, they should at least make an attempt to do so.

    For the third time this year, several Campbellsville City Council members have not shown up for a significant vote.

    At last week's Council meeting, during which the annual property tax rate was set, Members Sharon Hoskins, Paul Harmon, Stan McKinney, Randy Herron and Sue Smith voted to keep the same rate as last year. Council Members Richard Jeter and Vangie Ford cast the lone "no" votes.

  • Now with four confirmed cases of the N1H1 flu virus in our community, some might think it's time to panic. But there's no reason to if we take the proper precautions.

    All of those who have had the illness have been treated and are now well, according to Amy C. Tomlinson, public health services coordinator with the Lake Cumberland District Health Department in Somerset, and, to the best of their knowledge, the illness hasn't spread to our local schools.

    Tomlinson says she wants to be very open about the confirmed cases to help ensure that everyone knows the facts.

  • It's pretty special when a young man completes the requirements necessary to become an Eagle Scout. Such an honor shows the commitment, perseverance and dedication necessary to achieve such a feat.

    But to have an entire troop earn the Eagle Scout honor ... we are very much impressed.

    A story on today's front page details just such an occurrence. If you see these young men out in the community - or their parents or troop leaders - congratulate them for a job well done.

     

  • In today's paper, readers will find a special section that includes the fall schedules for local sports teams and marching bands.

    Whether we wear Cardinal red, Eagle purple or Tiger maroon, it's important for us to support these young men and women as they represent us in competitions against other communities' teams.

    We hope that parents, as well as community members, will support these students as they practice for hours on end in their attempts to represent our community well.

  • Magistrates are considering an ordinance that would address the issue of speed limits on county roads - and we're all in favor of it.

    There have been issues with speeds limits in the county for several years now.

    In April 2007, Taylor Fiscal Court agreed to set fines to accompany the County's speed limit ordinances. Sheriff John Shipp told magistrates that there was no punishment for someone who violated county speed limits. Sure, the fines set by the Court weren't too stiff but, hopefully, they at least gave drivers another reason to slow down.

  • First, it’s the increased traffic. Then it’s the crowded parking lots. Those are two of the more obvious clues that Campbellsville University has begun a new semester and students from all over have arrived to make Campbellsville their temporary home.

    But there are other clues as well — and many that are realized in places other than the CU campus.

    With the beginning of each new semester, there are extra people to spend money in our stores, buy our gas, eat our food, attend our local events … and to become an integral part of our community.

  • As readers will see elsewhere on this page, at least a few of Taylor County's constables are upset with something Sheriff John Shipp said at a recent Fiscal Court committee meeting.

    These two constables chose the right approach - taking issue with Shipp's remarks in a letter to the editor.

    However, at Tuesday night's Fiscal Court meeting, another constable, Marshall Graham, took a different route ... stating that News-Journal Staff Writer Calen McKinney must have "gotten it wrong" and that John Shipp wouldn't say such things about constables.

  • Even in times of economic uncertainty, Taylor Countians step up to the plate for causes they believe in. Recent Campbellsville Athletic Booster and Taylor County Food Pantry fundraisers are proof of that.

    The fifth annual Campbellsville University Athletics Booster Auction and Dinner raised $11,672, roughly a third of its annual operating budget.

    The CU Boosters help support athletics and the money raised will help purchase uniforms and other athletic supplies for all the sports programs, according to Chuck Vaughn, director of the Big Maroon Club.

  • Campbellsville resident Jefra Bland made her hometown proud last Friday when she was named a Top 15 finalist in the Miss Teen USA pageant in the Bahamas.

    While the pageant was Web cast on the Miss Teen USA Web site, it's a shame that it wasn't televised so more Campbellsville and Kentucky residents could watch.

    Bland, 19, won the Miss Kentucky Teen USA crown last December. That win gave her the opportunity to represent Campbellsville and Kentucky when competing for the Miss Teen USA crown - and a trip to the Bahamas.

    Thanks, Jefra, for representing us well.

  • Summer break is officially over. It's time once again to hit the schoolbooks, trading in those lazy days for homework assignments, research papers and tests.

    And it's also time for the rest of us to be more careful in our daily travels.

    Classes begin Wednesday for students at Campbellsville, Taylor County and Kentucky Christian schools.

  • After three years' hiatus, the Campbellsville Marching Eagles are back, and we're glad to see it.

    Band teaches kids more than just music. Marching band is about teamwork and dedication, the same as other extracurricular groups. Sports aren't for all kids, which is why band is an important addition to any school's list of activities.

    We wish you luck, Marching Eagles, and we'll be watching!

     

  • Tight financial situations seem to generate action in many different forms. Some of us cut back on our budgets, others get second jobs to make more money.

    In years past, tax money was enough for local governments to provide needed services. A decade ago, however, City and County governments decided that they needed more money to operate and instituted a 1 percent countywide occupational tax, with proceeds split between the two agencies.

    However, the first of this month, the two governments decided to go their own way, and now each agency has its own 1 percent tax.

  • If you read Monday's newspaper, you read a story about the increased development in the downtown area.

    Just take a drive down Main Street in Campbellsville ... talk about progress.

    From new specialty stores and restaurants to residential apartments and the nearly complete judicial center, downtown Campbellsville truly is booming ... at least during the daytime hours.

    We're hoping that some plans are under way that will extend that boom to the evening hours.

  • Sixty-three cents. That’s the best deal going these days.

    For each day a Taylor County Detention Center inmate works in our community, that’s how much it costs taxpayers.

    Inmate labor isn't new to our community - inmates have cleaned our roads for several years. But now inmates can help rescue and fire personnel with the duties that often go overlooked when there are not enough hours in the day.

  • The headline says it all. For those of you who took the time to enjoy at least some of the multitude of events scheduled as part of this year's Fourth of July Celebration, we know you were as impressed as we were.

    Friday activities have picked up in abundance - and popularity - and a large crowd enjoyed what Main Street had to offer. Having the K-Country Showdown on Main also seemed to be a popular addition.

    The weather cooperated for much of the day on Saturday, and shortly after 7 that morning several hot air balloons took to the skies.

  • There's nothing like a good book, and the Taylor County Public Library tries to keep that idea alive, even during the hot, lazy months of summer.

    Each year, the library participates in a statewide summer reading program sponsored by the Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives. This year the theme was "Be Creative @ Your Library."

    The free program is for children of all ages. Those who participate also receive free coupons for various statewide attractions.

  • We will celebrate our nation's independence on Saturday with a celebration the likes of which most communities only dream about.

    A story on today's front page gives all the details and there's a schedule of events we can clip out and take with us so we don't miss any of the exciting activities planned.

    Then, on Saturday night, the annual fireworks show will attract thousands to the Miller Park area.

    Fireworks are an American summertime tradition, especially around the Fourth of July. But, unfortunately, so are fireworks injuries.

  • Summer always seems to be a time of blood shortages, and this year is no exception.

    Students in high school, college and university make up about 20 percent of the River Valley Region's blood collection. With most students on summer recess, blood centers across the state are facing even more challenge to keep up their supplies.

    Summer is also the time when people take vacations and spend time doing other outdoor activities, oftentimes not taking the time to give blood as they normally might.

  • Each year in June, the Central Kentucky News-Journal celebrates Taylor County men with a special section. The newspaper also asks for help from the community in choosing one man, in particular, who has excelled in his family, career, community and church during the past year.

    Residents send in their nominations for Taylor County Man of the Year and then a committee of News-Journal staff and others meets to consider those nominations as well as others in the community.