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Opinion

  • Jolly Old St. Nick. Mr. Claus. St. Nicholas. All are synonyms for Santa Claus, the man who brings magic to children all over the world each year at Christmastime.

    Each year when Letters to Santa start arriving at the Central Kentucky News-Journal’s office, we are touched by the poignancy and trust expressed in children’s letters.

  • Through the mist and mythical creatures at Campbellsville High School's Hamilton Auditorium on Tuesday night, the crowd was treated to something a bit unusual, something they might have never seen before - a Bunraku puppet show.

    Wood and Strings Theatre brought Bunraku puppets to the stage and performed "Out of the Mist ... a Dragon," a tale of a young man's journey of self-discovery.

    The production was the second of this year's Central Kentucky Arts Series' season. And it was enjoyed by many.

  • Are you registered to vote? If not, you've only got a week from today to do it.

    With the governor's appointment of Dan Kelly to the judge's seat in the 11th Judicial Circuit, his seat in the Kentucky Senate is now vacant.

    And voters throughout the 14th District - Taylor, Green, Marion and Washington counties - will have a special election on Dec. 8 to elect his replacement.

    Mark Carney, Taylor County Clerk, said that residents who are not registered to vote must do so by Monday, Nov. 9 in order to participate in the special election.

  • While Memorial Day is a day set aside to remember and honor military personnel who died in service to their country, Veterans Day is the day set aside to thank and honor those among us who are serving their country today or who have served in the past.

    And Wednesday is that day.

    When we think of veterans, many of us automatically think of people our grandfather's age. But that's certainly not the case. Many young men and women in their early 20s are now veterans who have served in Afghanistan and Iraq.

  • Few things are as clear-cut or urgent as the need to get Kentucky's children off to a healthy start in life.

    One, whether you're a parent or a politician, it's a moral obligation. I firmly believe that. Two, Kentucky's future depends on our ability to create a talented, inquisitive and productive work force.

    One year ago, my administration launched an aggressive plan to tackle head on one of the biggest hurdles to our children's and our state's future: Lack of health insurance.

  • As we all well know, our nation is facing tough economic times. For a while, we seemed to fare better than many in other, larger cities.

    But real estate sales eventually slowed, companies are laying off workers and still others have instituted hiring and wage freezes.

    It's a tough time right now, for sure.

    A story on today's front page is the first in a series of stories about today's tough economic times and how many people are making do with less.

  • Overloaded circuits. Unattended candles. Cooking food left unwatched. All are common causes for house fires. All are so easily preventable.

    Next week, local firefighters will begin their annual fire prevention efforts, helping to arm our community's students with the tools they need to prevent fires and how to react in the event of a fire.

  • On Saturday evening, our community will be filled with witches and pirates, goblins and princesses, not to mention all sorts of strange-looking animals — and just about any other character children’s imaginations can invent.

    Halloween is a night of fun for our children. It shouldn’t ever be a night of mischief, danger or evil. And the spooky fun it provides shouldn’t be lost because, like so many things, a few people choose to abuse the occasion.

  • If you're not a regular subscriber to the Central Kentucky News-Journal, we bet you're wondering why you've received a copy of today's issue. Well, we wanted to show you what you've been missing.

    And there's no better way to prove our point than to simply show it to you.

    Our pages are chock full of news and photos as well as information from advertisers about their latest sales, services, classifieds and real estate.

  • In today's issue, readers will see five pages devoted to National Business Women's Week in October.

    On these pages, there are advertisements in honor of local women in business as well as feature stories about three Taylor County women who do their best to contribute to their community.

    This year's stories are about Linda Clark, Jane Wheatley and Karen Patton. Clark owns her own catering business, Wheatley is CEO at Taylor Regional Hospital and Patton renovated a building in downtown and started a day spa and salon.

  • So far this year, police have responded to 172 domestic violence calls in Taylor County. We are only 288 days into this year, which means that police have visited local homes for this one single reason entirely too many times.

    And that’s sad.

    October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, when all of us need to sit up and take notice of the sad state of our society in which people abuse the very ones they profess to love.

    Also during this month, officials try their best to get the word out that it doesn’t have to be this way.

  • Maybe you saw that National Football League players wore pink shoes, pink gloves, pink wristbands and carried pink towels this past week. Major League Baseball players brought pink bats to the plate on Mother's Day. All this is an effort to bring awareness to breast cancer.

  • Humanity is diverse. We need only look around us to see that. And it's our differences that make us unique.

    Unfortunately, all too often some focus on those differences and use them to keep people apart, rather than using them to bring us together.

    Just because we don't believe as someone else does, just because we might dress differently, just because we might speak a different language or just because we might have a different color skin - none of that makes one person any better than another.

  • The Central Kentucky News-Journal is your community newspaper. As such, we focus mainly on issues and events that happen in Taylor County.

    That's not to say we won't write about other nationwide or even worldwide issues, but those stories will be written with an emphasis on how they affect those of us who live in Taylor County.

    With the limited resources we have at our small newspaper, we usually can't touch those complicated investigative stories such as the nationwide economy or the current health care debate.

  • We just don't get it.

    Several in the community have said they're upset that the City bought a new ladder truck for the fire department.

    Did not everyone in town see the fire at the former Fruit of the Loom building? We should be grateful that Adair County had its own — and didn't mind helping us.

    Not even counting that building, we've got Jackson Tower, the new Judicial Center, the courthouse, several motels, Main Street businesses, local schools and other buildings that are tall enough that a ladder truck would be essential in fighting a fire.

  • It's all too easy to become complacent when we're doing something that's second nature to us.

    Accidents most often happen when we're doing something we've done hundreds - if not thousands - of times before.

    But when it comes to farming, that can be especially dangerous.

    According to the National Education Center for Agricultural Safety, farmers face a variety of hazardous environmental factors. Weather, terrain and atmospheric conditions all present a host of hazards and risks to agricultural workers.

  • "A good book is the best of friends, the same today and for ever."

    —Martin Farquhar Tupper

    We're excited! Woody, the Kentucky Wiener dog is back. And starting today, children in Campbellsville and Taylor County can follow along through 10 weeks of his adventures - and MISadventures!

  • The image a community portrays has much to do with how it's perceived by others. And a neat, clean, well cared for community will attract visitors — and keep them coming back.

    Green River Lake has much to do with our community's attractiveness.

    Whether it's fishing, water sports, camping or simply relaxing with friends, there's literally something for everyone to enjoy at the lake. There are also several miles of trails for hikers, bikers and horseback riders.

    But if those areas are used as a dumping ground for garbage, why would anyone want to visit?

  • It has been said many times that there's little to do in Campbellsville.

    Two weekends ago, there was something for everyone ... from shopping for bargains at the annual Tebbs Bend Flea Market to catching some fish at the Green River Lake Kids' Fishing Derby to going on a hayride at the Fall Heritage Festival at The Homeplace on Green River.

    And the best part about it all ... the majority of it was free.

    Our hats are off to those who organized last weekend's events, which attracted more than 1,000 people to the area.

  • We're having trouble getting it. On today's Opinion page, you will see the remarks made by President Barack Obama to American's schoolchildren on Tuesday.

    He talks about responsibility to one's self, the importance of education, hard work, opportunities, responding to challenges, commitment, success, strength and courage.

    Why would anyone object to a child hearing such words of encouragement?