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Opinion

  •  “Why would you give a needle to a drug addict?”

    Admittedly, I once thought that was a very stupid question. It would just enable an addict, make it easier for them to do their drug of choice. Why make needles easier to get? These were all thoughts I had when I first heard about syringe exchange programs.

    And so when I hear people express these thoughts, I don’t automatically discredit them, because it wasn’t that long ago that I thought the exact same thing.

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    For more than 100 years, this newspaper, or a version of it by various names, has brought the news to Taylor County.

  • I have spent a significant amount of time reading and trying to gather as much information about the horrific events that took place in Charlottesville, Virginia, this weekend. Masses of protesters and counter-protesters clashed and one person was killed and 19 or 20 others injured when a 20-year-old man from Ohio (but recently moved from the Florence, Kentucky area) drove his car into the crowd, plowing over anyone and everyone in his path.

  • As we turn the page on July 2017, I find myself asking the same question once again, “Is summer over already?” To the disappointment of most Kentucky students, and many parents, the answer is an overwhelming “yes.”

  • Welcome, Kentucky Derby visitors!
    That’s our hospitable greeting each year as we update you on Kentucky’s political landscape, which continues to be of national interest.

  • A wide array of bills were heard in committees and voted out of the Senate in a busy and exciting third week of the 2017 Session. Because this year’s 30-day meeting of the Kentucky General Assembly is considered a “short session,” we make sure we maximize our time here in Frankfort.

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    Before the dust settled from the November election, President-elect Donald Trump waded out into turbulent waters by expressing his dislike for flag burning. Even though this may not be a “front burner” (pardon the pun) issue for many Americans, it does present us with interesting ambiguities.

    For instance, if a ban is passed on flag burning, how will VFW posts all over the country properly dispose of worn and tattered flags?  Ironically, burning a flag can be both a symbol of respect and contempt in America.

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    And it came to pass in those days, that there went out a decree from Caesar Augustus that all the world should be taxed.

    (And this taxing was first made when Cyrenius was governor of Syria.)

    And all went to be taxed, every one into his own city.

    And Joseph also went up from Galilee, out of the city of Nazareth, into Judaea, unto the city of David, which is called Bethlehem; (because he was of the house and lineage of David.)

    To be taxed with Mary his espoused wife, being great with child.

  • When you think of going to the public library and checking out a book, that might sound like an old and outdated practice. It might even remind you of life in a slower time, before technology came along and changed our world so much, as it has in recent years.

    There may be some libraries out there that are still behind the technological times, but that statement couldn't be any farther from the truth when it comes to the Taylor County Public Library.

  • A lawsuit against Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis, who stopped issuing all marriage licenses after the U.S. Supreme Court legalized same-sex marriage last month, is the first legal challenge of its kind in the country. Davis says gay marriage violates her religious beliefs, so she elected to halt licenses for all couples.

  • Steve Lowery, former news editor at the Central Kentucky News-Journal, was a visionary. He could see the potential even before most of us could even fathom what could lie ahead. Even though we lost Lowery too early in life, at the age of 54, his contributions across the state, newspaper industry and the communities where he worked are still being felt and recognized.

  • Those who pay an abundance of taxes while they are alive shouldn't have their estates be required to pay a large amount of taxes to the government after they pass away.

    It's simply not fair and causes an undue burden on a family grieving over the loss of a loved one.

    We are of course referring to the estate tax, or, as many people refer to it - the death tax.

    The federal tax is levied on multi-million-dollar estates after a person in that tax bracket dies.

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    In a week where many Kentucky fans were disappointed to see their basketball Wildcats fall in the Final Four of the NCAA Tournament, another Wildcat continued to make the state, and especially his hometown of Campbellsville, quite proud.

     On Sunday, J.B. Holmes wrapped up another tournament title on the PGA TOUR, winning the Shell Houston Open.

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    Nature lovers believing they are helping to preserve some of Kentucky's greatest treasures, its lands, forests and streams, just got a rude surprise about the special "nature" state license plate they purchase.

    Proceeds from the $10 extra they pay for the plate, which is supposed to go to the Kentucky Heritage Land Conservation Fund, instead are being siphoned off for the ever-insufficient state General Fund and used for other purposes, The Courier-Journal's Tom Loftus reported recently.

  • Editor’s Note: Below is a guest editorial in response to a Dec. 25 editorial by Jason Bailey with the Kentucky Center for Economic Policy.

  •  It’s kind of like Alison Lundergan Grimes has one-upped St. Peter. The Democratic challenger to U.S. Sen. Mitch McConnell has been excoriated in the usually friendly urban media for denying Barack Obama four times before the cock crowed. Or at least before the Courier-Journal went to press.

  • Your bra is not giving you breast cancer.

    Your deodorant is not giving you breast cancer.

    Coffee is not giving you breast cancer.

    Mammograms are not giving you breast cancer.

    In a large percentage of cases, your genes aren't even giving you breast cancer.

    As with anything that escalates to the level of attention breast cancer has received, there are several myths about the disease. There are posts all over social media and even reports on mainstream media that do nothing but incite fear over incorrect information.

  • It's a week to celebrate in the newspaper industry. Oct. 5-11 is recognized as National Newspaper Week, and as times are changing in our business in many ways, we continue to approach our work with pride in the product we present to you.

    Today, many people look at the newspaper industry, and the first thing that comes to mind is, "Newspapers are a thing of the past."

  • Since the beginning of recorded and unrecorded history - before the days of Rights to Life or Pro-Choice, Papal declarations, even contraceptives - human beings have been reproducing. It's just in our hard wiring and the only way any and all of us are here today.

    In addition to the joy of embracing little bundles of joy, one pragmatic benefit for our forefathers and foremothers was, in effect, "creating" their own work force which was essential to farm life since there wasn't another pool from which help could be hired such as we have today.

  • Even after he took his last breath, Tony Grider was never alone.

    Firefighters stood by Grider's side until he was put to rest yesterday afternoon, and they did so every minute after he was injured on Aug. 21.

    Saying goodbye to someone is never easy, and we know the past two days have been especially hard for Grider's family and all the brothers and sisters he served with at fire and EMS.