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Opinion

  • Imagine you run a company and once a month you must cast a net for a new pool of temporary workers. You send letters and notify potential hires to report for a meeting, where they will learn if they make the final cut. They could miss time at their regular jobs, and they would be paid only $12.50 a day for the special assignment at your company.

  • CKNJ Editorial Board

    The past week has been full of celebration. And what a celebration it was.

    With perfect weather, thousands of people came to Taylor County last week for our annual Fourth of July celebration.

    The events spanned a week, from singings and concerts to parades to games to food to hot air balloons to fireworks.

    But throughout the celebration, the feeling that we were all free to enjoy the holiday is one we're sure everyone felt.

  • About 1.6 million students will graduate from college this year, according to The National Center for Education Statistics. They will be searching for full-time work, but the odds are stacked against them. Although the job market is improving, competition is fierce and jobs are scarce and the U.S. Labor Department says unemployment among 2013 graduates is still high at 10.9 percent. In addition to those concerns, college graduates are saddled with student loan debt - it has passed the trillion-dollar mark - and often credit card debt.

  • Today's issue of the Central Kentucky News-Journal is a gift from us to you.

    We at the CKNJ want you, the members of our community, to know that we are dedicated to providing you the news you want and need to read.

    As such, we give our community a free sample of that news every few months. We want you to know what you're missing if you don't subscribe or buy our paper on the newsstand.

    The CKNJ is truly your paper. With a small staff, we can't be everywhere and don't know about everything going on in our community.

  • The 2014 General Assembly session is all but wrapped up. The regular session ended with a two-week break, and the members returned on April 14 and 15 to address any potential vetoes by the governor and tie up loose ends.

    There were some successes in this legislative session, but also just as many disappointments as legislators wrangled with some tough issues while ignoring others.

  • CKNJ Editorial Board

    The building, crumbling before our eyes, won't be there much longer. And, as sad as it might seem to see something of such history destroyed, our community will be better off with it gone.

    Central Kentucky Motor Lodge, that once gave people who needed it a place to stay, will soon become a pile of rubble.

    After fires and years of decay, the building's owner has acknowledged that it's time to see it torn down. We agree.

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    In the end, the family that disrupted - or tried to disrupt - so many funerals with their messages of hate took the easy way out. When news came that the Rev. Fred Phelps, whose small and rabidly anti-gay ministry known as the Westboro Baptist Church, had died on Thursday, his daughter said there would be no funeral for her father.

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    There's a lot of information out there, and you have the right to almost all of it, especially when it comes to your government.

    This week is Sunshine Week in the news industry, and it's a time to recognize the importance of letting light shine on open government and freedom of information, thus the name.

    We are often asked why we publish some things in our paper, like property transfers, food service inspections and other items of public record. The answer is an easy one; you have the right to know.

  • Kentucky is on the brink of sweeping reforms in how it treats youths who wind up in the court system - especially those who commit minor crimes or "status offenses," actions that would not be an offense at all for adults, such as running away or missing school.

  • Midway through the 2014 legislative session, members of the General Assembly still can't find a way to do one simple thing: Let the voters of Kentucky decide whether they want change that could generate more revenue for their communities and help ease the cash crises facing so many cities and counties throughout the state.

  • Change may come slowly to Kentucky, but things are definitely changing when it comes to public opinion about issues including smoking, gay marriage, medical marijuana, minimum wage and who should be the state's next U.S. senator.

    Those were among issues Kentuckians were asked about in the latest Bluegrass Poll, conducted by Survey USA in an expanded effort that for the first time brought together four major news organizations, including The Courier-Journal, WHAS-TV, the Lexington Herald-Leader and WKYT-TV in Lexington.

  • Should Campbellsville residents be limited when it comes to having yard sales? We don't think so.

    While the Campbellsville City Council has been discussing the issue, we can't help but wonder where the real problem lies.

    Council members have discussed potential traffic problems, but it seems having police officers ticket those who create the traffic problem would be a better alternative than patrolling yard sales and possibly citing someone over a permit.

  • Former Secretary of Agriculture Richie Farmer betrayed the public's trust through his illegal actions while in office, and we feel he received the appropriate sentence.

  • Oklahoma-based Williams Co. and Texas-based Boardwalk Pipeline Partners want to build a pipeline to pump natural gas liquids across the commonwealth. The partnership expects it will not be able to negotiate sales with 2 percent of landowners along the route.

    Although the proposed Bluegrass Pipeline's exact path is unknown, it will enter Kentucky in Bracken County and run through many central Kentucky counties to link up with an existing pipeline in Breckinridge County.

  • Find a way to help others this holiday season

     

    'Tis the season for so many things: decorations, presents, Santa, ice, snow, the flu.

    There are likely a hundred different things on your mind or your "to do" list at this very moment. Chances are, not all of them are pleasant. Actually, some of them probably incite worry.

  • The National Federation of Independent Businesses estimated that Small Business Saturday generated $5.5 billion in sales for America’s locally owned shops in 2012. It’s too early to know if the promotion for independent retailers matched or surpassed that mark this year. But judging from the recent buzz for supporting local economies, we’d say the odds are that 2013 will be a good one for small stores.

  • Thanksgiving is the most straightforward of holidays, unencumbered by the expectations of Christmas or the letdown that often accompanies New Year's Eve. This Thursday's holiday has little buildup and virtually no fanfare: a big meal, some football and perhaps a nap.

  • In the Nov. 14 issue of the Central Kentucky News-Journal, you might have read a story about Taylor County's magistrates being approached for money by several local groups.

    At its Nov. 12 meeting, Taylor County Fiscal Court had several items on its agenda that involved local groups and organizations asking for financial contributions. While this is in no way a statement against those organizations or their importance, it is one intended to address the information many people might not have about the operation of a governmental body such as the fiscal court.

  • This fall, Congress has an important opportunity to create jobs and grow the economy by passing a long-term, comprehensive Food, Farm and Jobs Bill. The Farm Bill impacts every American, every day, by providing a wide range of programs that strengthen our nation.

  • Employers, colleges and vocational schools have long recognized the GED test as a high school equivalency degree. It was developed in the 1940s so American soldiers returning from World War II could use the GI Bill to advance to college. Many had left for the military without finishing high school.