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Today's Opinions

  • Economic development needs to go forward

    I think we could all agree that economic development is important to our community.

    Since Fruit of the Loom packed up its underwear and Batesville Casket Co. its caskets nearly a decade ago, developing the local economy has been one of our few salvations.

    One would think that hasn't changed. Economic development should be job No. 1 on everyone's mind.

    However, local governments can't seem to agree.

  • Road to the future is paved with bumps

    This week and next mark the official end of childhood for area high school seniors. They'll be considered "grownups" now.

    Sure, they have the summer to look forward to ... sunny days at the lake, sleeping late, last flings with their friends, but, for many, the dog days of summer are the last of the carefree times.

    Adulthood is now staring them in the face.

  • Like it or not, alcohol sales have arrived

    If one particular issue would split the opinion of voters in Campbellsville, we suspect alcohol might be it.

    The lead-up to this year's primary was about as tame as it could possibly get. Even though we witnessed way more letters opposing alcohol than approving of it, we suspect that there were a number of people who never really let their feelings be known until they stepped behind the curtain on Tuesday and punched "yes" or "no" on the referendum question about the sale of alcoholic beverages in restaurants.

  • Hair today, gone tomorrow

    We've tried bribery. We've begged. We've pleaded. All to no avail. After all of our years together, she's leaving us.

    Yep. My family's hairstylist is retiring.

    We're panicking. And it's not just me; the kids are in a tizzy, too. With the exception of a handful of occasions when our schedules didn't mesh, no one else has ever cut our hair.

    Now, if you're a man reading this, you likely won't understand our dilemma. "What's the big deal?" you're thinking. But I can pretty much anticipate the thought from many women: "Oh, you poor girl. I feel for you!"

  • It's time to perform your civic duty

    Tomorrow is Kentucky's Primary Election. And it's up to us to see that those who we believe will do the best job get the most votes.

    Of course, without many local races, officials don't expect a large turnout. However, County Clerk Mark Carney said he believes we'll have a better turnout locally than the state as a whole.

    Apathy certainly won't get us where we need to be.

  • What is censorship?

    A student newspaper adviser, with whom we had a working relationship, has resigned over a disagreement that he perceived as the school administration's censorship of student work.

    The administration disagrees.

    A story in The Press, an industry newspaper published by the Kentucky Press Association, said Tom Winski chose not to renew his contract with Lindsey Wilson College after new contract language required him to review articles for the LWC student publication - The View - prior to publication.

  • County folk locked out of alcohol vote

    Call me crazy, but I thought all Taylor Countians were a part of Campbellsville? I live in the county but when asked where I live I say "Campbellsville." I've lived in Campbellsville all my life. I never did understand why just the "city" people voted for mayor. But I'm glad Brenda Allen is our mayor.

    I never said anything. I let it go. But with this issue about alcohol being served in our restaurants and dining with a meal, I will not sit by and say nothing.

  • Reverse the Medicare cuts

    I urge you to do all you can to assure Congress reverses the mandated 10.6 percent cut in Medicare payments to doctors scheduled for July 2008. Action is needed by mid-June or Medicare will begin processing payment cuts.

    The cuts in payments to doctors will devastate seniors' and all military beneficiaries' access to health care by encouraging even more doctors to stop seeing Medicare and military TriCare patients. Military beneficiaries are affected even more severely because TriCare rates are capped at Medicare levels, and in many cases are discounted below Medicare's.