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Today's Opinions

  • Health care is America's most important issue

    The United States has the finest and most advanced health care system in the world, but millions of Americans do not have access to and cannot afford the high cost of health insurance.

    The American people should let every person in Congress know that the Republicans who voted to sustain Bush's veto of the Children Health Care Bill have for the time being abruptly ended the fight for all Americans to have available to them affordable and proper health care, and they should be remembered at election time.

  • Memorial Day turns out to be memorable

    At Monday's ceremony honoring Taylor County war dead and those who have served and are still serving, the Junior ROTC from North Hardin High School performed a "Prisoner of War/Missing in Action/Missing Man" ceremony.

    No other editorial comment is necessary but to allow you to read the script as read that day:

  • Will superdelegates fly?

    Kentucky's primary election is over, but the dust still hasn't settled.

    Shuffling through the vote counts the morning after the election was a somewhat disheartening experience for this reporter. Kentuckians came out in droves to vote, nearly doubling the pre-election turnout predictions. That's great, but that's not the problem.

    Hillary Clinton easily won the Kentucky Democratic presidential primary race. Barack Obama is claiming an overall victory. Clinton isn't conceding. The race, though the primaries are nearly over, is apparently still very much underway.

  • Economic development needs to go forward

    I think we could all agree that economic development is important to our community.

    Since Fruit of the Loom packed up its underwear and Batesville Casket Co. its caskets nearly a decade ago, developing the local economy has been one of our few salvations.

    One would think that hasn't changed. Economic development should be job No. 1 on everyone's mind.

    However, local governments can't seem to agree.

  • Road to the future is paved with bumps

    This week and next mark the official end of childhood for area high school seniors. They'll be considered "grownups" now.

    Sure, they have the summer to look forward to ... sunny days at the lake, sleeping late, last flings with their friends, but, for many, the dog days of summer are the last of the carefree times.

    Adulthood is now staring them in the face.

  • Like it or not, alcohol sales have arrived

    If one particular issue would split the opinion of voters in Campbellsville, we suspect alcohol might be it.

    The lead-up to this year's primary was about as tame as it could possibly get. Even though we witnessed way more letters opposing alcohol than approving of it, we suspect that there were a number of people who never really let their feelings be known until they stepped behind the curtain on Tuesday and punched "yes" or "no" on the referendum question about the sale of alcoholic beverages in restaurants.

  • Hair today, gone tomorrow

    We've tried bribery. We've begged. We've pleaded. All to no avail. After all of our years together, she's leaving us.

    Yep. My family's hairstylist is retiring.

    We're panicking. And it's not just me; the kids are in a tizzy, too. With the exception of a handful of occasions when our schedules didn't mesh, no one else has ever cut our hair.

    Now, if you're a man reading this, you likely won't understand our dilemma. "What's the big deal?" you're thinking. But I can pretty much anticipate the thought from many women: "Oh, you poor girl. I feel for you!"

  • It's time to perform your civic duty

    Tomorrow is Kentucky's Primary Election. And it's up to us to see that those who we believe will do the best job get the most votes.

    Of course, without many local races, officials don't expect a large turnout. However, County Clerk Mark Carney said he believes we'll have a better turnout locally than the state as a whole.

    Apathy certainly won't get us where we need to be.