Today's Opinions

  • It's up to us to make the right choice

    For weeks and weeks, OK ... make that months and months, we've been inundated with advertisements and speeches and photo ops from our national election candidates.

    Well, we're down to the wire now. And history will be made - we will elect either a black President or a female Vice President.

    But all of the hullabaloo of the past months aside, when you walk into the voting booth and close the curtain, it's important to ask yourself a few honest questions:

    - When I choose a candidate, am I truly voting for the candidate I believe will do the best job?

  • While we slept, Congress looted our Social Security

    High Social Security payroll taxes have contributed to yearly Social Security Trust Fund surpluses until the proclaimed surplus is now in excess of $2,140 billion ($2.14 trillion).

    However, Congress has elected to sacrifice Social Security on the alter of corruption by spending the entire surplus, requiring the U.S. Treasury to cover the embezzlement by issuing non-negotiable IOU bonds to the Trust Fund. Such irresponsible and reprehensible behavior should alert voters that no member of Congress has the integrity to be our president.

  • Lack of marching band hurts students

    Needless to say, after having read Calen McKinney's column in which it stated the Campbellsville High School band program has declined tremendously, as well as not having a marching band this year, it greatly affected me. It was at that moment that I began to reflect of my years in the band.

  • Juvenile arthritis a serious crisis

    When Senators Mitch McConnell and Jim Bunning return to Washington, D.C. after the November election for a "lame duck" session, they will have a final opportunity to complete work and pass the Arthritis Prevention, Control and Cure Act (H.R. 1283).

  • October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month

    October is Domestic Violence Awareness Month. It is sad that we must designate a month to highlight the problem of domestic violence, but this perverse, insidious malady is not going away.

    Each September, the National Network to End Domestic Violence conducts a 24-hour census across the entire United States. Shelters and other agencies who work with victims of violence are asked to count the number of people they helped during that day.

    Here are some of the statistics from September 2007 (2008 numbers are still being tabulated).

    National Summary

  • Be safe this Halloween

    Tomorrow evening, our community will be filled with ghosts, goblins, witches, princesses, all sorts of strange-looking animals - and just about any other character a child's imagination can invent.

    Halloween shouldn't ever be a night of mischief, danger or evil. And the fun it provides for both children and adults shouldn't be lost because, like so many things, a few people choose to abuse the occasion.

  • No one should have to live in fear

    The numbers aren't looking good.

    Last year, victims' advocate Heather Barnes investigated 215 domestic violence complaints. This year, she has already investigated 296 ... and that's only through the end of September.

    There were 273 days from January through September, which means that there has been more than one a day.

    Like we said, the numbers aren't looking good.

    And that's sad.

    October is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month, a time when officials try their best to get the word out that it doesn't have to be this way.

  • Every vote really does matter

    I have always loved documentaries.

    Give me a movie about some real-life situation, a good book of someone's memoirs or a television show documenting something worth watching, and I'm set.

    I didn't realize I had a thing for documentaries until maybe seven years or so ago when I began watching real-life crime shows and made-for-TV movies on Lifetime.

    My first crime shows were "CSI" and "Law and Order SVU."

    I know those shows aren't documentaries, and aren't real life, but it got my interest in real-life crime dramas started.