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Today's Opinions

  • Teen Board worth your time

    Here at the News-Journal, we're gearing up for the fifth year of our Teen Editorial Board.

    And we're excited.

    The staff at our office is a little too far removed from their teenage years to be trying to tell our readers what's going on in the world of teens. Because of that, we decided a few years ago to let the younger generation tell about their world in their own words.

  • Getting paid less and less, spending more and more

    Our United States is now nothing more than a nation of closed doors, locked up tight and bolted from the inside while any other doors refuse to open and provide advancement in one's life, if that one is the common working man. This is a land of lost hopes and dwindling opportunities for those who have to struggle for a living that they can hardly keep up.

  • The buck stops at the School Board office

    We were expecting a big crowd at Tuesday night's Taylor County School Board meeting. Boy, were we surprised when no one showed up.

    We were as concerned as anyone when we learned about the "top story" on WHAS' Monday night news broadcast. A suspected problem with mold and mildew at Taylor County Elementary School making many children ill is certainly something parents need to know about.

  • There's no place like home

    It's been just about a year since I left my parents' house and dove head first into homeownership.

    If the past year has taught me anything, it's that you can never have enough money and there will always be something that needs fixing.

    I've learned how to use a drill (and the strange looking accessories that go with that drill), that watering plants every day may not be good for them and that sump pumps aren't fun when they aren't working correctly.

  • Too many kids are still hungry

    In America, millions of low-income families struggle each month to obtain a minimally adequate diet. In 2006, 12.6 million children and 22.9 million adults lived in households struggling against hunger, and those numbers are expected to grow amid a weakening economy, rising joblessness and increased food prices.

    It is an outrage that hunger would plague so many in one of the world's biggest food exporters, where more than enough food is produced to feed every American.

  • Justices should interpret the law, not create it

    I'm writing regarding Kathryn Kolbert's editorial "Fair pay? Not for women," published in the Aug. 14 News-Journal. Her main idea is one I agree with completely - since we the people don't get to vote for Supreme Court Justices, we need to make sure to elect a President who will appoint the right people to the bench.

    I just completely disagree with Kolbert on her description of the right people.

  • State rep race gets more important

    This year's race for State Representative just became even more important.

    Citing a battle with cancer, Democrat Doug Mullins has dropped out of the 51st District race.

    Mullins, a current Campbellsville City Council member, ran unopposed in the May primary. He would have faced Republican John "Bam" Carney in the November General Election in an attempt to fill the term vacated by Russ Mobley, R-Campbellsville.

    Mobley will not seek re-election for health reasons.

  • Fair pay? Not for women

    In the last half-century, we've taken huge steps to ensure that all Americans get treated equally in the workplace. From the landmark civil rights legislation of the 1960s and onwards, fair hiring and pay regulations have allowed women and minorities to stand up for themselves and demand the equal treatment they deserve on the job.

    The impact of that progress has been tremendous. An entire generation of Americans understands that they have a right to fair and honest treatment on the job - a far cry from the days when women could be openly denied "men's jobs."