.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Not thankful enough

    I am definitely not a writer, but after a week of thinking about how hard times are with gas and groceries being so high and jobs so hard to find, it was put on my heart to write how thankful I am for my job.

    I live within three miles of my workplace, so it takes very little gas to get there and it's not an ordinary workplace. The place I work is Campbellsville Apparel. It is a little plant with about 200 employees. It opened in 1999 and has had its ups and downs. Being laid off most of 2007, people were getting worried about our jobs.

  • Still no sidewalks

    Another spring and still no sidewalks on North Central.

    I'm sure the barn at the golf course was in bad shape, but was it so unsafe that it couldn't wait a couple more years?

    If we can't afford the concrete, couldn't the City at least clean off the bank so people could at least get off the road? I'm sure a dirt path would be better than challenging the oncoming traffic.

    Maybe we could get Campbellsville University involved as they have a lot of students who use the road.

    Rick Quinn

    Campbellsville

  • Drugged driving should be a crime too

    One beautiful June morning in 2006, four community leaders from Bowling Green set out for a scenic drive on their motorcycles. For two of them, the ride would be their last.

    As they were driving through Logan County, a truck driver crossed a double-yellow line, killing two of the men and seriously injuring another. The truck driver had in her possession marijuana and drug supplies. In fact, she admitted to driving with drugs in her system, and tests verified that she had smoked marijuana before driving the vehicle.

  • What gets your news hackles up?

    Ever since Satan took the form of a snake and tempted Adam and Eve, there has been a mystery associated with reptiles.

    Not since we published a story last week about a man charged with transporting "poisonous" snakes without a permit did we realize how some of what we do so affects our readers.

    Write a story about a child being abused (and this is Child Abuse Awareness Month) and you might never hear a peep. Write a story about someone transporting snakes and you're getting advice all day.

    That's what makes the news business so interesting and frustrating at times.

  • The art of campaign strategy

    We have a computer-generated sign on our conference room door that reads "Innovation Station." But an idea I read about from another newspaper may be THE most innovative idea that I've come across.

    In the April issue of Publishers' Auxiliary, a newspaper trade publication, Jim Pumarlo talks about a Minnesota (Tubby Smith territory) newspaper publisher who generated national headlines when he started charging 5 cents a word for letters to the editor that endorse a candidate.

  • Someone to inspire us

    We are standing at a crossroad in history. This has been and will be a record-breaking presidential election, in more ways than one. And for the first time in a long time, Kentucky voters will play a crucial role in selecting the presidential nominees.

    The Republican presidential primary has already been decided and they have quite a formidable candidate in Senator John McCain. But it's the Democratic race that still has many people on the edge.

  • You can help show care for victoms too

    National Crime Victims' Rights Week, which will be observed April 13-19, calls on all of us to consider the life-changing impact that crime has on victims and their loved ones, and to make justice for victims an urgent priority for our communities. This year's theme clearly expresses that sentiment: "Justice for Victims, Justice for All."

    This means that there will be no justice for any of us if we don't always seek fairness for our victims. I ask now that everyone in this community reach out to those who have been victimized and stand behind all those harmed by crime.

  • Child abuse even more prevalent

    It's getting worse. That's a fact. A story in the works for Monday's issue will tell it like it is.

    The number of reported child abuse cases in Taylor County is on the increase.

    The story focuses on statistics from Prevent Child Abuse Kentucky. Last year, according to the organization, there were 269 cases of child abuse involving 369 children reported in Taylor County. Of those, 58 were substantiated, involving 105 children.

    In 2006, there were 202 cases reported, involving 228 children. About 50 of those cases were substantiated, involving 74 children.