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Today's Opinions

  • Join us in celebrating Black History

    "History, despite its wrenching pain, cannot be unlived, but if faced with courage, need not be lived again."

    -From Maya Angelou's "On the Pulse of Morning"

    Beginning with today's issue and continuing through the month of February, the Central Kentucky News-Journal will be running a four-part series highlighting Campbellsville residents in honor of Black History Month.

  • Lewis' antics give him a black eye

    Not many of us get a chance to choose our successor. Most of us wouldn't consider it part of our job.

    That's how it is in the private sector. But politics are different.

    My cynical mind tells me Congressman Ron Lewis was trying to handpick his successor - Daniel London - last week when one filed and the other withdrew all within a few minutes of each other, so close to the filing deadline.

  • February is American Heart Month

    The elderly man hunched over from age, shuffling down the sidewalk.

    The older lady in the wheelchair with oxygen feeding through her nostrils.

    That's the face of heart disease in America, isn't it?

    Look at the face on this column mug. A healthy-looking 40-year-old woman.

    That's also the face of heart disease and a heart attack survivor.

  • Councilman says smoking ban unnecessary

    When discussing smoking bans, arguments about health dangers are usually the first to be raised. I would like to settle this dispute once and for all with airtight evidence that smoking is dangerous to both smokers and those in their company.

    Even if tomorrow the Surgeon General took back every negative claim that has been released about how harmful tobacco smoke is, and we had solid scientific proof that inhaling smoke was no more harmful than breathing fresh air, smokers still pose a danger to themselves and others.

  • Dental exam a good idea if you can afford it

    A bill being proposed in the state legislature would require children to have a dental exam before starting school. Students today already must have a physical exam, an eye exam and up-to-date immunizations. And an addition such as this, while it could pose a hardship for some families, certainly makes sense.

    A similar bill was first proposed about seven years ago. Each year, however, it has gotten lost in the legislative process.

  • Teachers have all the patience

    As we waited for the morning announcements to begin, we sat quietly in our seats and worked on our journal entries: What are three things that help to make you feel better when you are sick? Tell how they are comforting to you.

    I got a check mark for completing the assignment, and then it was on to adjectives.

    But it wasn't long before all the coffee I drank earlier that morning had me squirming in my seat. I raised my hand. "Miss Dial, may I go to the restroom?" I asked.

  • Pets need a voice in Frankfort too

    My name is Jenia Webb-Sizemore. I live in Leslie County, Ky. I am unofficially lobbying for a House Bill called "Romeo's Law."

    Unofficially means I've taken this task upon myself. I have not been recruited by any elected politician. I am a pet owner and I have worked in the criminal law field for 18 years.

    After seeing State Rep. Stan Lee on my local news being interviewed regarding his proposal of the bill and hearing very little about Romeo, I researched Romeo's story and could not believe what this poor puppy went through at the hands of his owner.

  • We need to abolish the federal Reserve

    I would like to give my thoughts regarding the article, "Schools could face major cuts."

    Most people don't ask themselves a few simple questions regarding where money ultimately comes from to fund our public schools. Everyone should be outraged by who and what backs up this money.

    All this money, which is really credit, comes from the Federal Reserve. The FED is privately owned by international bankers and is independent of the U.S. government. The Federal Reserve Act was passed Dec. 23, 1913.