.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Opinions

  • Magistrates not being thrify with Cat Hollow

    It's Christmas and you ask your family to supply a list of things that they might like to receive as a gift. But instead of going by the list, you decide to buy your wife a gift so expensive that you can no longer afford anything for anyone else. To top it all off, what you bought your wife wasn't even on her list.

    Well, Merry Christmas Taylor County, you just received Cat Hollow Road.

    Magistrates last Tuesday earmarked a $200,000 expenditure that no one but them appears to covet.

  • Hopes Smoking Ordinance goes through

    I hope that Campbellsville goes forward with a smoking ordinance in public buildings. All businesses should be smoke-free for health reasons.

    Also smoking should not be around the outside of doors and entrances. Those who smoke should have consideration for those who don't because it has an impact on other people.

    Tommy Larimore

    Greensburg

  • Named sources are always better

    When Judith Miller was arrested and jailed for not releasing to authorities the name of the person who outed then-undercover CIA agent Valerie Plame, the world of journalism was turned upside down.

    Realizing that it would be a long shot for me to receive Miller treatment in Central Kentucky because I wouldn't release a source to authorities didn't matter. News sources are sacred. But, then, we seldom use unnamed sources anyway.

    That didn't matter either.

    Recently, the U.S. House of Representatives overwhelmingly passed The Free Flow of Information Act.

  • Don't water down Smoking Ordinance

    Who will Campbellsville City Council listen to - business interests or those interested in protecting the health of our workers? We'll find out in December when City Council next discusses a possible smoke-free law.

    At issue are the perceptions that smoke-free laws are bad for business and that installing ventilation systems will reduce secondhand smoke exposure. On both counts, nothing could be further from the truth.

  • Keeping Cat Hollow open was right thing to do

    Thank you, Magistrate Milford Lowe. You saw the bigger picture of keeping Cat Holler (Hollow) Road open and had all the facts.

    My name is Stan Lowe and I live in Illinois, but my dad, Norman E. "Doc" Lowe was born in what was called "Lowe Town" back off of Cat Holler (Hollow) Road. So was my grandpa Norman Lowe and my great-grandpa William Lowe. My great-great-grandpa Obediah Lowe, was one of the pioneers of this part of Kentucky. He migrated from Virginia back in 1816. My ancestors, unlike the current owners, have paid taxes in that area of Kentucky for almost 200 years.

  • Don't need Council to take care of me

    Not only is it a lie that second-hand smoke is the third leading cause of death in the country, and not only is it a lie that 1,000 deaths in Kentucky resulted from second-hand smoke last year, not one person has ever died from second-hand smoke. Show me a coroner's report that says so.

    More precisely, if you review all the scientific studies of environmental tobacco smoke that have ever been completed, no significant scientific correlation between ETS and increased mortality can be shown.

  • Homeless are getting some help

    Food and shelter are two things most of us never have to worry about. But not everyone is so lucky.

    A story in Monday's News-Journal about the problems Debbie Martin experienced drives home the point that homelessness isn't just a big-city problem. It can happen here. It's a real problem, and a solution isn't always easy.

    Luckily, Green River Ministries is trying to do something about homelessness - and just about every other opportunity to help humankind.

  • People share their thanks

    It's always exciting to hear from readers. And it's especially nice to hear about good things that have happened.

    And, next week on Thanksgiving Day, anyone who picks up a newspaper will learn about some really good things that have happened to others in our community.

    It's nearly time to announce the winners of the News-Journal's annual Thanksgiving letters contest. And the judges are busy reading hundreds of letters of thanks.