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Today's Opinions

  • City Schools vote to make travel easier

    It's funny how far two dollars will go.

    For sports teams and other extracurricular groups at City Schools, it may not be how far $2 will take them but the psychological boost knowing they may not have to raise that much more just to participate for their school.

    In January, a Campbellsville Board of Education proposal was floated that traveling groups from City Schools would have to pay $3.86 a mile for bus travel.

  • Beagles rock at Westminster

    I'd been looking for the right time to return to this page, and when my ole buddy Uno carted off the top dog ribbon at the Westminster Kennel Club Show last week, I figured the moon and stars were actually aligned.

    Words started flowing off my paws again like campaign promises. I could hardly stifle myself.

    Yes, it's time for change all right. Why can't a canine run for the White House? Lord knows there's been some dogs already on the campaign trail.

  • Some lessons about race do come early in life

    February is Black History Month, probably as good a time as any to let Skip know I'm sorry even if the offense committed against him occurred nearly 50 years ago.

    The memory is as vivid as the permanent stain put on our society by the way black people have been treated for decades.

  • Any savings is a good savings when buying drugs

    For some reason, it always seems more difficult to fork over the money for necessities than it does for luxuries. It's much more pleasant to spend money going to the movies than paying the electric bill.

    But the electric bill is a necessity for all of us. And so is medicine.

    A story in Monday's News-Journal gave the details on local pharmacies' generic drug programs, programs that are going to save us all some money.

    Generic drugs, according to the FDA, are exactly the same as brand-name drugs. They just cost less.

  • It's time to unearth Lincoln family legends

    Many of us who have lived in LaRue County all our lives are descended from this region's earliest settlers.

    Our ancestors homesteaded in what was then Hardin County in the early 1800s, during the time the Lincoln family toughed it out at Sinking Spring Farm and Knob Creek. That means plenty of family legends, some with substantiation, have resurfaced with the focus on the Lincoln Bicentennial - the 200th celebration of the birth of our most famous native son, Abraham Lincoln.

  • Comment on our stories online

    As many readers already know, the Central Kentucky News-Journal has been in the process of redesigning its Web site since late last year.

    While it's still not all that it will be eventually, it's getting better all the time.

    A few weeks ago, we added an archive search that allows readers to search the past several months' issues. We eventually hope to provide older archives, though that may be some time in reaching our Web site.

  • Beshear should stop playing politics with our troops

    The Lexington Herald-Leader and WHAS 11 recently reported about the Beshear Administration's firing of Eric Landis, an Air National Guardsman who had served as a staffer to Gov. Ernie Fletcher. Beshear fired Airman Landis less than a month after he returned from active duty in violation of state and federal law.

    At first, I was reluctant to speak out on behalf of Landis, who is a registered Republican, because I did not want to politicize this issue. I actually felt it was worth giving the Beshear Administration the opportunity to do the right thing.

  • People are willing, and like, to take chances

    Heading toward its 20th year, the Kentucky Lottery has certainly made its presence known in Taylor County. Last year alone, Taylor Countians bought $3.6 million in lottery tickets. That's an amazing amount of money.

    But at the same time, Taylor County has reaped benefits as well. Payback in prizes totaled $2.2 million, while $1.8 million was paid in college scholarships.

    At least we got back more than what we paid out.

    A story on today's front page details all the aspects of the Kentucky Lottery.