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Today's Opinions

  • Government should stay out of tobacco work age issue

    Since the beginning of recorded and unrecorded history - before the days of Rights to Life or Pro-Choice, Papal declarations, even contraceptives - human beings have been reproducing. It's just in our hard wiring and the only way any and all of us are here today.

    In addition to the joy of embracing little bundles of joy, one pragmatic benefit for our forefathers and foremothers was, in effect, "creating" their own work force which was essential to farm life since there wasn't another pool from which help could be hired such as we have today.

  • Saying goodbye to a hero

    Even after he took his last breath, Tony Grider was never alone.

    Firefighters stood by Grider's side until he was put to rest yesterday afternoon, and they did so every minute after he was injured on Aug. 21.

    Saying goodbye to someone is never easy, and we know the past two days have been especially hard for Grider's family and all the brothers and sisters he served with at fire and EMS.

  • Voters lose when candidates feud

    A campaign bus that doesn't have the proper permits to carry passengers. A campaign manager who resigned because of rumors he might be connected to an improper donation in Iowa last year.

    These are the topics it seems the campaigns for both sides of the U.S. Senate seat in Kentucky want to talk about.

    Of course, the candidates don't want to talk about their own campaign problems. They want to talk about their opponent's.

  • McConnell, Grimes face tough questions in first debate

     

    After 30 years in Washington, U.S. Senate candidate Alison Lundergan Grimes says she no longer believes Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is the best candidate for Kentucky's farmers.

    "Never has a senator been paid so much for doing so little for the people in Kentucky," Grimes said at Kentucky Farm Bureau's "Measure the Candidates" forum, at the group's headquarters in Louisville on Wednesday.

  • The face of farming takes on a new look

    When you think about farmers, what do you picture?

    For many, the word likely conjures images of a middle-aged man in overalls driving a tractor.

    Quint Pottinger is not that farmer.

    Recently, Pottinger was named an agriculture Champion of Change by the White House and U.S. Department of Agriculture for his efforts to grow the next generation of farmers, his initiatives and his involvement in state agricultural organizations.

  • Starting the year off right

    It's been said that each summer seems shorter than the last.

    And even though the days on the calendar don't really get any fewer, feeling that they go by in the blink of an eye is understandable.

    It seems like only days ago that local high school seniors went to prom and crossed the stage to get their diplomas. We wish them best of luck at college or the workplace.

    Students at Kentucky Christian Academy went back to class on Tuesday and Campbellsville and Taylor County students once again grazed their hallways starting Wednesday.

  • State needs to overhaul jury duty pay

    Imagine you run a company and once a month you must cast a net for a new pool of temporary workers. You send letters and notify potential hires to report for a meeting, where they will learn if they make the final cut. They could miss time at their regular jobs, and they would be paid only $12.50 a day for the special assignment at your company.

  • Why we celebrate

    CKNJ Editorial Board

    The past week has been full of celebration. And what a celebration it was.

    With perfect weather, thousands of people came to Taylor County last week for our annual Fourth of July celebration.

    The events spanned a week, from singings and concerts to parades to games to food to hot air balloons to fireworks.

    But throughout the celebration, the feeling that we were all free to enjoy the holiday is one we're sure everyone felt.