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Letters

  • Sen. Bunning can help rural Americans with rising health care costs

    Kentucky Sen. Jim Bunning has an opportunity to help millions of older Americans in our state and throughout the nation.

    As a member of the powerful Senate Finance Committee, he can play a leading role in relaxing unreasonable asset limits that restrict access to Medicare's low-income programs. These low-income program improvements would be especially helpful in states with significant rural populations like Kentucky.

  • Smoke-free restaurants should be totally smoke free

    I applaud Campbellsville in its efforts to wrestle with the smoke-free restaurant ordinance.

    As Campbellsville addresses this important issue, I would certainly encourage it not to come short by passing anything short of a 100 percent smoke-free restaurant ordinance. This would offer both restaurant workers and patrons access to clean air.

    Even in restaurants with separate ventilated smoking areas, restaurant employees are exposed to high levels of second-hand smoke as they have to service both smoking and non-smoking areas.

  • Cat Hollow decision was the right one

    In response to your online article (Nov. 15, 2007) on the dispute over keeping Cat Hollow Road open, it was good to see that the majority of the magistrates voted for the good of Kentucky and the area.

    My ancestors are from that area and I've studied the maps. It is my hope to one day own property back there and build a home. Magistrates do well to consider the future of an area and not just a whim of one or two folks.

  • Mad at cable companies

    Many football fans in our state already know that big cable companies are taking advantage of consumers and preventing them from watching their favorite football teams.

  • More pressing problems than smoking issue

    What are we coming to? When City Council can tell business owners what they can do in establishments privately owned, what is wrong with this picture?

    I can understand the problem of second-hand smoke, but what about our rights? No one has offered to take it to a countywide vote and let the people decide.

  • Cat Hollow Road information not all true

    It seems like you all don't have all of the information correct.

    The $200,000 figure is ridiculous for the first thing. I really don't know what kind of road Mr. (Judge/Executive Eddie) Rogers thought we wanted through there. This is really a high figure for about half-mile of road.

    We have let everyone have any money for upkeep for the last 30-plus years, so we deserve help out here. If it was in another part of the county then I wonder how you would feel? I guess we are considered a poor part of the county, but we have paid taxes for many years.

  • National Home Care Month

    More than 11 million Americans would rather be treated in the comfort of their own home when they are sick, than a hospital, nursing home or outside health care facility. Millions more will be added to our ranks in the near future.

    Our country's ability to maintain an effective health delivery system will be decided on how we care for vulnerable populations of Americans such as the aged, the chronically ill, the disabled and children.

  • Elizabethtown restaurants not affected

    A few nights ago, my wife and I went to an Elizabethtown restaurant for a special birthday dinner. It was so nice to not have to worry about any secondhand smoke no matter which of the restaurants we chose due to the Elizabethtown smoke-free ordinance that went into effect several months ago. Every report I know of is only positive about their ordinance.

  • Cigarette smoking can be slow-motion homicide

    Like numerous communities in Kentucky, Campbellsville is seriously considering the important step of prohibiting smoking in restaurants. This is taking place all over the U.S. as people become more and more aware of the serious health consequences of exposure to other peoples' smoke.

    In my capacity as a professor at Western Kentucky University for 25 years, I was in Campbellsville many times, teaching students from Campbellsville.

  • What about making tobacco a drug?

    You printed the article about smoking (by Staff Writer James Roberts). Well, how about making tobacco a drug same as marijuana and all the dope that brings in billions of dollars yearly? Alcohol drinks are very bad, too.

    Campbellsville would not even be where we are today. Farmers depended on tobacco to pay off their bills and equipment. Today, in these times people get all doped up, with dope of all kinds. They get drunk, come home, spend their money, beat up their wife and children. Now the peddlers are selling dope to school children.