.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Unfortunately, it wasn't an April Fool's joke

    Third-graders plotting to attack their teacher? Oh, come on, I thought. This must be someone's sick idea of an April Fool's Day joke.

    Apparently it wasn't. According to the Associated Press, a group of nine third-graders in south Georgia actually did hatch such a plan.

    The children, ages 8 and 9, were supposedly mad at the teacher because she had scolded one of them for standing on a chair.

  • The art of campaign strategy

    We have a computer-generated sign on our conference room door that reads "Innovation Station." But an idea I read about from another newspaper may be THE most innovative idea that I've come across.

    In the April issue of Publishers' Auxiliary, a newspaper trade publication, Jim Pumarlo talks about a Minnesota (Tubby Smith territory) newspaper publisher who generated national headlines when he started charging 5 cents a word for letters to the editor that endorse a candidate.

  • Wanna bet gambling comes up again?

    Casino gambling, that divisive phrase that has been floating around since Steve Beshear announced his candidacy for governor, is dead.

    The obituary appeared in statewide papers on Friday.

    Not even a landslide Democratic governor could leverage the necessary support out of a Democrat-controlled House to get it to a floor vote.

    I'm disappointed.

  • Separation crashes the party

    They've been up to their elbows in Jell-O together. They've played musical chairs together. They've shared pizza together. And they've signed each other's T-shirts. The only difference was the color pen they used: red or purple.

    For the past 21 years, Project Graduation has been the one time our local high school students get together for a combined celebration. On this one special night, all the rivalries of the past four years seemed to take a back seat to fun.

  • Hair today, gone tomorrow

    Katie Irwin was just another name on a list - a rather long list - of people willing to have their heads shaved to help kids fight cancer.

    I didn't know Irwin before March 15th and still don't, really. But I feel close to her - a member of the hairless brother/sisterhood, if you will.

    Irwin is the Campbellsville University junior who baby-sits Max and Heather Wise's children - Grayson, Jackson and Carter. The latter is the 10-month-old in the midst of a battery of cancer treatments for something called Stage IV neuroblastoma.

  • Wherefore art thou?

    I'll admit, it was a little odd to be talking Shakespeare with a class of third-graders. Especially since they knew more than I did.

    I was a guest Monday of Becky Grant's third-grade class at Taylor County Elementary School. I was there to talk with the students about their performance the day before of Shakespeare's infamous tragedy, "Romeo and Juliet." And what a performance it was.

  • Hold that newspaper obituary

    For years community newspapers have been riding the coattails of metropolitan dailies. The ride hasn't been all that great.

    Nationally, newspaper readership has taken its share of hits and criticisms. But what we knew in the community journalism business was never allowed to make forecasting reports because the data from our sector was jaded by the dailies, where a different story was emerging.

  • Putting public record on the record

    From speeding tickets, misdemeanors and indictments to marriages, divorces and land transfers, the News-Journal publishes a myriad of public records.

    Do you read them? How interested are you in reading about them? Which of them are you more interested in?

    We honestly want to know what you think.

    That's why the Central Kentucky News-Journal is conducting a reader survey about public records. We would appreciate your opinion on the content of the News-Journal's On the Record page - what you read, what you don't read and what you think about it.

  • The pickup deserves its own praise on National Agriculture Day

    March 20 is the first day of spring, and it's also National Agriculture Day.

    And that means it's an appropriate time to salute our local farmers.

    I could write volumes about tobacco quotas and foreign imports and the need to buy American, and how our farmers are struggling to keep the rest of us fat and prosperous.

    But I'm not going to do that.

    I've decided it's time another icon of American self-reliance and rural independence received some appreciation. And I don't think farmers will mind at all.

    It's something near and dear to each and every one of them.

  • End of writers' strike is welcome relief

    For the last three months, I've tried to balance feelings of relief and frustration over the Hollywood writers' strike.