.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • Coming up short, but still fighting cancer

    I made a challenge for myself, and as badly as I hate to say it, I failed.

    As Taylor County's annual Relay for Life event kicked off on Friday evening, I had set a goal for myself to walk 100 laps around the high school track to raise money in memory of my friend and co-worker, James Roberts, who died of cancer last year.

    The money-raising efforts were supported by many of you, either in the form of a donated amount or in the form of a pledge made for each lap I walked.

  • Proud of Taylor County

     

    Taylor Countians are pretty lucky.

    Our community is full of people who pitch in to help others, and most of the time for nothing monetary in return, only the satisfaction of making a difference in someone else's lives.

    There are three specific examples I can give you of this happening just in the past few days.

    First, a committee of people put together last Friday night's annual Relay for Life events to raise money to fight cancer.

  • Walking for James

     

    As many of you know, the Central Kentucky News-Journal lost a close friend last year when James Roberts, a reporter for the newspaper, lost his battle with cancer. He was 36 years old.

    I got to know James while I worked at the Springfield newspaper. When I came to the CKNJ, we quickly became even closer friends, and we discovered that we had similar interests in books, movies, music and more. Few knew it about him, but he was even a hockey fan.

  • A teacher who changed lives

    To that very first class of students who sat in his classroom more than 34 years ago, he said he was sorry.

    "I had no clue what I was doing," William Wallace Evans said.

    Yet every person who attended the retirement celebration for Taylor County High School's longest-serving agriculture teacher on May 31 will readily vouch for Evans' value as an educator and leader in the Taylor County community.

  • Pausing to remember

     

    They gathered to remember and say thank you.

    Even in the pouring rain, more people turned out this year than in several past years to attend the community's annual Memorial Day service.

    If you haven't been to the service, I recommend you go next year. Several local dignitaries speak, American Legion members perform a flag ceremony and there are moments of prayer and song. It's a touching ceremony, simply put.

  • True success should be celebrated

    The way I see it, in many ways this country is headed down hill fast; it's in high gear and nobody's touching the brakes.

  • Former CKNJ writer on hand for Holmes' Wells Fargo win

     

    I would never have dreamed it in 1975, when in the dead of winter, I moved from South Carolina to Campbellsville and rented a farmhouse from Bess and Clement Whitlock.

    But here I was in late April and early May at Quail Hollow in Charlotte, N.C., working as a volunteer - as I have for the past seven years - for the Wells Fargo Championship.

    This year, however, proved to be extra special at the fabulously beautiful and lush green golf course that some say rivals even Augusta National and the Masters as THE tournament on the PGA tour.

  • A dose of reality

     

    They watched as their friends, one by one, died tragic deaths. And as obituary after obituary was read, the message sunk in.

    Most of the teenagers lost their lives in car crashes, from drinking and driving or texting while behind the wheel. We all know we shouldn't do either, but, for some reason, people still test their limits sometimes.

    And that's why teenagers - and adults - need the message sent at the recent Ghost Out at Campbellsville High School and mock crash at Taylor County High School.

  • Take pride in Kentucky Derby

    This is a special week to be a Kentuckian. If we didn't get enough attention for our college basketball teams during the recent NCAA tournament, now comes an even bigger stage, another way to shine the spotlight on the Bluegrass State.

  • Taylor County — a great place to live

     

    The giggles were contagious.

    As I waited for the event to start, I saw the children's excitement grow. It was palpable. They had their homemade, home-decorated buckets in tow, ready to hear the adults tell them "go."