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Columns

  • A fourth pair of shoes

    I owned three pairs of shoes when this story began.

    A pair of shoes showed up at my house a few years back. That's not all that unusual, except these showed up by themselves, with no one attached.

    I was coming up the drive to the garage one day when I saw a plastic Walmart bag with something in it lying against the house. There's always something laying around our house, mostly kids, so my curiosity wasn't peaked until a couple of days later. The bag was still there.

  • The Bible's message is not just in its words

    If you were to insist that what makes the Bible a special book is not its outward appearance - whether it's bound in leather or cloth, colored bright pink or plain brown - but what's inside - its message, meaning, and purpose - I would heartily agree.

    But then again, the very presence of the Good Book can not only speak to the soul, it can even save a life.

  • Shake hands or fist bump?

    John Lennon and Paul McCartney couldn't have known the danger in the words they wrote with the Beatles first major hit, "I Want to Hold Your Hand."

    "And please say to me, you'll let me hold your hand."

    In case you haven't heard, holding and shaking hands can be hazardous to your health.

  • A year gone by

     

    It's hard to believe it's been a year. And what a year it's been.

    I will admit it; I'm one of those who thought it wouldn't happen. We would never have enough money. People wouldn't want higher taxes to pay for it. But here we are, and it's all paid for.

    The new Taylor County Public Library opened its doors last March, after years and years of planning, saving and hoping.

    And on Tuesday, March 18, library staff members will host a party to celebrate the first birthday in their new building.

  • Christian concerts a blessing to community

     

    Entertainment isn't hard to find in most places these days, and I've lived in a few places that had more than their share. But for me, Campbellsville does it as good as any smaller community I've ever lived or worked in, hands down.

  • New truck limits would weigh heavily on state's roads

    On Feb. 4, the Kentucky Senate passed a bill that would allow heavier semi-trailer trucks hauling poultry, livestock and agricultural products to travel on all state and local roads, raising the maximum weight from 80,000 pounds to 88,000 pounds.

  • Looking back on the Olympic games

    The curtain has fallen on the games of the 22nd winter Olympiad. The host country, Russia, was the overall winner with 33 total medals, while the United States finished with 28 total medals. But in my opinion, we, the viewers, also came away with a win because we were given a couple of weeks of entertainment like no other on TV.

  • Phones show lack of attention, respect from children

    As I sat in McDonald's last week, in one of the seemingly rare moments I have that's not in full-on rush mode, I noticed an old couple eating lunch with what was presumably their grandson at the next table down from me.

    The kid was maybe 8 or 9 years old, undoubtedly off from yet another day of school.

    This is where I would normally describe him in greater detail, but the only way I would have been of any help in that department was if he had committed a crime and was in a lineup.

  • Slow down to smooth out the wrinkles

    I've been told that it ended with the Reagan administration. It could have been cabin fever or just my horrible habit of leaving clothes in the dryer to re-wrinkle, but this week, I ironed my clothes. And I'm feeling much better because of it.

  • Cities, counties need local control through local option

    Cities and counties, small and large, across Kentucky have big dreams for their communities - ideas that are transformative and can have lasting impact for generations.

    Bardstown wants to build a YMCA to help keep its residents healthy. Eastern Kentucky communities dream of transforming the region into a destination attracting hunters, anglers, campers and adventure tourists. Louisville hopes to build a 100-mile hiking and biking path across the city - the type of amenity that attracts young people and entrepreneurs who start businesses and grow the state's economy.