.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Columns

  • A dad's point of view

    As Mother's Day rolls around once again, I find myself reflecting this year on the different obligations we feel towards those mothers in our lives, at different times and passages in our lives.

    As this is the second Mother's Day since my own mother died, I can't help but remember her with the fondest recollections, avoiding the sad, last and declining years of her life when a stroke took away her sparkle and delightful personality.

  • Public scrutiny: What it's all about

    If I could give an award to Casey Circuit Judge James G. Weddle, I would. He knows what it's all about.

    Weddle refused to sign a settlement order recently for a lawsuit involving a Liberty teenager who sued the County government. Driving a Mack truck, a County road worker rear-ended 17-year-old Jeremy Wilson's Chevy Blazer in December 2006.

    Weddle denied the motion presented by attorneys because the order of dismissal provided for a settlement that is confidential.

  • Get your copy, I'll wait for you

    I was like a child in a candy store. Except this candy store was full of stories, not chocolate.

    Last weekend, I went with a friend to the Southern Kentucky Book Festival in Bowling Green. My attendance at this festival is an annual trip I look forward to for months.

    Hundreds of authors gather at the fair to talk with their readers, sign autographs and have panel discussions about their books and writing.

  • What's the word, teens?

    We're going to find out why so many teenagers are reading the Twilight saga.

    At Sunday's meeting of the CKNJ Bookmarks reading group, we discussed our last book choice, a set of two novellas, "Dinner With a Perfect Stranger" and "A Day With a Perfect Stranger." The books were an easy read, first-person accounts of two young skeptics who encounter Jesus, and his answers to their most challenging and most personal life questions.

    Some of us liked the books, and others didn't.

  • Stories that stay with us

    As a reporter, I sometimes write stories that seem to stay with me and tug at my emotions, whether it's about someone dying in a car crash, a fire that left a family homeless or someone accused of hurting an innocent child. One such story that recently tugged at me was about child abuse. It gave statistics that show that the number of reported child abuse cases last year was higher - much higher - than in 2007.

  • The difference between good ... and great

    When simply looking at a single photograph causes an instantaneous reaction, either physical or emotional, you know it's not simply a good photo, it's a great one.

    Sitting there in the small alcove, in the midst of a museum full of strangers, I both laughed and cried. I gasped and I winced.

    I spent nearly an entire day immersed in history last week. And I enjoyed every moment.

    I suppose I should mention that history ranks only slightly above math on my list of interesting things in life ... and math is dead last.

  • Let's reform health care without growing the government

    The nation's preeminent business organization recently released a study showing that the high costs of the American health care system puts American businesses at a significant disadvantage.

    The Business Roundtable, which represents some of the country's biggest corporations, found that for every $100 the U.S. spends on health care, our main competitor countries - the United Kingdom, Canada, Japan, France, and German - only spend about 63 cents.

  • Health insurance options in a tough economy

    In the last four months, 2.6 million jobs have disappeared from the American economy. About half the people who had those jobs also lost their health insurance.

    But a job loss doesn't have to mean a loss of insurance coverage, too. A provision in the recently passed economic stimulus bill makes health insurance significantly more affordable for the involuntarily unemployed. The federal government will now subsidize premiums for insurance plans purchased under the terms of a law called "COBRA."

  • Am I really getting paid for this?

    You know, sometimes I feel guilty calling what I do work. Sure, there are times when I feel like I'm not being paid enough. But there are also times when I have to stop and ask myself, "Am I really getting paid for this?"

    After a week of vacation, I returned to work last week with the dreaded prospect of two evening assignments.

  • The older I get ...

    Why is it that the older we get, the more we cherish our youth?

    It's not that I want to be young again ... heavens no. I've just begun to cherish those memories of years past, which really don't seem quite as old as they really are.

    A couple of months ago, I found a friend from 30 years ago on Facebook and, just Monday, I joined an alumni group from the junior/senior high school I attended at Subic Bay Naval Base in the Philippines. My family lived there for two years in the 70s before my dad retired from the Navy and we moved to Campbellsville.