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Columns

  • More of what you want to read

    We want to bring you more of what you want to read. So that's exactly what we're going do.

    Starting with today's issue, we are eliminating some of the features in the News-Journal that we believe aren't as well read as or as necessary to our readers as others.

    We're doing this in order to have more space on our printed pages for the items you want to read.

  • Less aggravation, more action please

    "A little less conversation, a little more action please,

    All this aggravation ain't satisfactioning me,

    A little more bite and a little less bark,

    A little less fight and a little more spark."

    —Elvis Presley "A Little Less Conversation"

    Here's my two cents.

    I just finished teaching two introduction to communication classes last week at Campbellsville University.

  • Mothers worth more than you thought

    According to NBC News producer Jay Blackman, I'm worth a lot of money.

    His Monday night story, "What is a mom's work worth?" laid it all out on the line.

    "They say it's the small things, but when it comes to mothers, the small things really do add up. Whether it's driving to karate, making doctor appointments, or paying the bills, Mom's job is never done - and she does it all for free."

  • Sometimes separate is best

    "I'm just gonna let you pass,

    Yes, and I'll go last.

    Then time will tell who fell

    And who's been left behind,

    When you go your way and I go mine."

    —Bob Dylan "Most Likely You Go Your Way (And I'll Go Mine)"

    Though hopefully no one falls, I agree with Bob Dylan. Sometimes you just have to go your separate ways.

  • Domestic violence epidemic continues

    It is much too easy to write a column about domestic violence these days. Sadly, there are abundant examples all over the news. I wish these stories never happened.

    In Middletown, Md., an accountant for a railroad company killed his wife, his three children and then himself. The bodies were discovered by the children's grandfather on April 18. The 33-year-old mother and three children received "traumatic cuts" and were also shot. The father left five notes and apologized to family members in one of the notes. He apparently faced psychological and financial problems.

  • A dad's point of view

    As Mother's Day rolls around once again, I find myself reflecting this year on the different obligations we feel towards those mothers in our lives, at different times and passages in our lives.

    As this is the second Mother's Day since my own mother died, I can't help but remember her with the fondest recollections, avoiding the sad, last and declining years of her life when a stroke took away her sparkle and delightful personality.

  • Public scrutiny: What it's all about

    If I could give an award to Casey Circuit Judge James G. Weddle, I would. He knows what it's all about.

    Weddle refused to sign a settlement order recently for a lawsuit involving a Liberty teenager who sued the County government. Driving a Mack truck, a County road worker rear-ended 17-year-old Jeremy Wilson's Chevy Blazer in December 2006.

    Weddle denied the motion presented by attorneys because the order of dismissal provided for a settlement that is confidential.

  • Get your copy, I'll wait for you

    I was like a child in a candy store. Except this candy store was full of stories, not chocolate.

    Last weekend, I went with a friend to the Southern Kentucky Book Festival in Bowling Green. My attendance at this festival is an annual trip I look forward to for months.

    Hundreds of authors gather at the fair to talk with their readers, sign autographs and have panel discussions about their books and writing.

  • What's the word, teens?

    We're going to find out why so many teenagers are reading the Twilight saga.

    At Sunday's meeting of the CKNJ Bookmarks reading group, we discussed our last book choice, a set of two novellas, "Dinner With a Perfect Stranger" and "A Day With a Perfect Stranger." The books were an easy read, first-person accounts of two young skeptics who encounter Jesus, and his answers to their most challenging and most personal life questions.

    Some of us liked the books, and others didn't.

  • Stories that stay with us

    As a reporter, I sometimes write stories that seem to stay with me and tug at my emotions, whether it's about someone dying in a car crash, a fire that left a family homeless or someone accused of hurting an innocent child. One such story that recently tugged at me was about child abuse. It gave statistics that show that the number of reported child abuse cases last year was higher - much higher - than in 2007.