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Today's News

  • KET documentary features Green River

    A KET documentary that heavily features Green River and talks about the importance of preserving it was shown Thursday night at the Campbellsville Civic Center.

    “This show is about rivers,” said Dr. Richie Kessler, a biology professor at Campbellsville University. “The real star of the show is your river, the Green River … It’s just as much Campbellsville’s river as it is Greensburg’s river.”

  • World War II veteran passes away

    Conrad Claycomb was a wonderful man with a very positive outlook on life, according to those who knew him.

    Despite what he had been through in life, the local World War II United States Army veteran was optimistic and looked for the best in people.

    Claycomb was the last living Taylor County resident to have survived a World War II prisoner-of-war camp.

    He passed away last Monday, March 27, at the age of 92 at the Thomson-Hood VA Center in Wilmore, Kentucky.

  • County jail faces overcrowding

    Nearly all of Kentucky’s county jails are experiencing overcrowding issues, and the Taylor County Detention Center is no exception.

    According to the Kentucky Department of Corrections’ Weekly Jail Report, which is released each Thursday, TCDC had a total of 285 inmates as of March 23.

    This puts TCDC at 140 percent capacity, as the facility only contains 204 jail beds.

  • $100,000 grant would finish paving trail

    Campbellsville’s Trail Town Committee plans to finish paving the Trace-Pitman Greenway, thanks to a $100,000 state grant.

    At a public hearing held by the committee Tuesday evening, the group announced that it will apply for a $100,000 Recreational Trails Program grant. If approved, work could begin next year.

    That money would pave the remaining 3,900 feet of the 1.5-mile trail, which starts at the Trace Creek softball park and ends at the soccer fields off of KY 210.

  • Mild winter saves salt, money for city, county

    There are roughly 6,000 miles worth of roads in Taylor County.

    The city of Campbellsville maintains about 1,000 miles of those, while Taylor County maintains about 3,000 miles and the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet maintains the remaining 2,000 miles, according to the Lake Cumberland Area Development District.

    As there hasn’t been much snow this year, both the city and county have plenty of salt left over.

  • Wooley sentenced for sexual abuse of 14-year-old girl

    A Greensburg man will serve more than four years in jail for the sexual abuse of a 14-year-old girl last year.

    At a Tuesday afternoon hearing, Taylor County Circuit Judge Allen Bertram sentenced William Q. Wooley, 38, to five years in jail, minus the time he’s already served since his arrest on May 19.

    Once released, Wooley will have to register as a sex offender.

    During the proceedings, Assistant Commonwealth’s Attorney Angie Call had the victim’s mother address the court and Wooley.

  • Water plant project will cost millions

    Fixing a sludge problem at the city’s Water Treatment Plant will ultimately cost the city millions of dollars.

    But money left over from previous water-related projects means it might not cost as much as previously feared.

    At Thursday evening’s Campbellsville Water and Sewer Committee meeting, members unanimously recommended that Campbellsville City Council members move ahead with applying for a Kentucky League of Cities loan for the project, expected to cost $4,362,000.

  • Truth and Consequences

    The high school years are a time of critical decision-making for most people.

    During the ages of 14-18, people make several important decisions such as their friend groups, their plans after high school, and much more.

    Last Thursday, elected officials and local leaders across the community put together an event in an effort to speak with high school freshmen about the decisions they will be making, how to make the right decisions, and the consequences of wrong choices.

  • Community welcomes new high school

    Taylor County High School held their open house for the new school last Tuesday with a large crowd on hand to tour the school and check out all that it has to offer.

    Visitors were able to check out various classrooms and other portions of the school such as the cafeteria and library. They were also able to get a glimpse into the various student enterprises that Taylor County Schools Superintendent Roger Cook has highly touted.

  • Bestiality bills die in legislative session

    Two bills that would have dealt with the sexual abuse of animals didn’t come to the floor of this year’s Kentucky General Assembly legislative session.

    Neither House Bill 143 nor House Bill 480, both of which would have criminalized bestiality, made it out of the Kentucky House of Representatives’ Judiciary Committee, and never received a committee vote there.

    Kentucky is one of nine states that do not have a ban on the sexual abuse of animals.