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Today's News

  • Lady Tigers scratched in opening round of NAIA tourney

    Campbellsville University was outscored 23-12 off 25 turnovers, and the Lady Tigers dropped their first game in the NAIA National Tournament 64-60 to Columbia (Mo.) College on Thursday morning in Jackson, Tenn.

    "When you get to this level of competition, your weaknesses are exposed," said coach Ginger Colvin. "We've had a problem with turnovers all year and we did here today."

  • Kickin' the habit: Smokers have several options

    Occasionally, the urge comes over Charlotte McFarland. She needs a cigarette.

    "There are times that I wanted to smoke, but I know that if I just wait a few minutes, the feeling will go away."

    McFarland's 30-year habit was hard to break, but she says that after a few false starts, she and her husband, Frank, were finally able to kick smoking for good.

    "We had been wanting to quit for a long, long time," she said.

  • Looking to the future

    When the Lady Tigers took the floor Thursday morning for a first-round match-up in the 29th Annual Women's NAIA Division 1 Basketball National Championship Tournament, coach Ginger Colvin was in familiar surroundings.

    Colvin's history with the Lady Tigers in Jackson, Tenn. dates back to 1990 when she was a senior guard for then Campbellsville College. The second-year coach tied up some loose ends of a trifecta of sorts ... trips to the national tournament as a player, assistant coach and head coach.

  • Officials seek share of stimulus money

    From help with jail construction costs to water and sewer projects, local officials are putting in their requests for federal economic stimulus money.

    Kentucky will receive about $3 billion over the next 28 months for investments in health care, education, energy, infrastructure and economic development. In addition, the state will be able to compete for further investments in areas such as energy research and education.

  • That great big hill of hope

    Paradoxically, in this time of almost crushing concern over the state of our nation, the inauguration of a new President ushers in, at least briefly, a period of palpable hope.

    Hope for a better economy, for demonstrable progress in Iraq, Afghanistan and the Middle East, and for improvements in everything from climate change to education to Social Security to health care. Indeed, optimism abounds even as things seem to be falling down all around us. It's the American way.

    But those aren't the only things we have to feel hopeful about. Or, for that matter, to worry about.

  • Could it be time to quit?

    We're looking at the possibility of a local ban on smoking. And now smokers are facing a sizable increase in price to support their habit.

    Could it be time to evaluate our priorities?

    We all know by now that smoking is bad for our health as well as the health of others around us.

    According to the Centers for Disease Control, Kentucky ranks No. 1 in the instance of lung cancer in both men and women and ranks highly in the instance of other types of cancer brought on by smoking.

  • TRH to offer classes

    Taylor Regional Hospital will present several upcoming classes pertaining to life support, violence in the workplace and more.

    A basic life support class for healthcare providers who wish to obtain or renew their BLS certification will be offered on the following date:

    - Thursday, March 19 from 1 to 5 p.m.

    Cost for the class is $40, which includes a book.

  • Goodbye CATS, hello progress

    CATS has breathed its last breath.

    After several attempts in recent years, Kentucky lawmakers have finally agreed on a plan to hammer the final nail in the CATS coffin.

    So, after 10 years of working toward the 2014 proficiency goal, we're changing course. Sounds kinda discouraging, doesn't it?

    But the fact is that stuffing CATS back in the bag could be the boost that education in Kentucky needs.

  • Ag Day celebration is March 20

    The Homeplace on Green River will host an Ag Day Educational Celebration on Friday, March 20.

    More than 400 area eighth-grade students from Taylor, Adair and Green counties will attend.

    Most people know the importance of agriculture, though children may not. This event will teach area children the importance of agriculture.

    The Homeplace is a volunteer, nonprofit organization.

    The event is free, though cost of admission to the Homeplace is normally $5.

  • Public record for March 19

    It is the policy of the Central Kentucky News-Journal to publish public records as they are reported by various agencies. Names appearing in "On the Record" are published without exception, to preserve the fairness and impartiality of the CKNJ and as a news service to our readers.

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