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Today's News

  • Deadline to participate in PRIDE cleanup is Monday, Sept. 21

    October is Roadside PRIDE Month in Kentucky, and Taylor Countians who want to participate have until Monday, Sept. 21 to sign up.

    Taylor County Solid Waste Coordinator Debbie McNear said the month is geared toward cleaning up the community and she encourages schools, nonprofit organizations and churches to volunteer their time.

    Throughout the month of October, volunteers will pick up roadside litter in selected areas. The PRIDE organization will provide garbage bags and pay for the disposal of the garbage and other items collected.

  • TRH to offer advance directives session

    Taylor Regional Hospital will present a free Advance Directives Informational Session on Thursday, Sept. 17 from 5 to 6 p.m. at the TRH Learning & Resource Center located at 125B Kingswood Drive in Campbellsville.

    The class will be presented by Ramona Hieneman, attorney, director of corporate responsibilities.

    This class will provide an overview of advance directives, which should enable participants to be better informed regarding questions and decisions.

  • Airport hosts first 'fly in' event

    The Taylor County Airport Board will host the first annual "fly in" on Saturday, Sept. 19.

    Gates will open at 10 a.m. and festivities will continue through 4 p.m.

    There will be live music, food, inflatables for children, airplane rides and more.

    The free event is open to everyone. For more information, call 789-4182.

     

  • LWC to host family weekend, international festival

    The Lindsey Wilson College community will celebrate families and the international culture of the A.P. White Campus on Sept. 18-20.

    Lindsey Wilson will host Family Weekend and its annual international student festival on Friday through Sunday.

    "This weekend's events are a great example of what makes Lindsey Wilson such an interesting place to attend and work," said LWC Director of Student Activities Jayne Hopkins, who has been at the college since July.

  • City goes green with sidewalk project

    Campbellsville is about to get a little more green.

    As part of the Meader Street sidewalk project currently underway, a portion of the sidewalk will be constructed with pervious concrete.

    Pervious concrete is a porous type of pavement, meaning water runs through the surface, reducing runoff and pollution.

    In a presentation to City workers on Wednesday, Greg Smith of the Kentucky Concrete Pavement Association, said pervious concrete is becoming the application of choice for parking lots, sidewalks, park trails and residential streets.

  • Former inmate files lawsuit against jail

    A former inmate at the Taylor County Detention Center is suing four jail employees, accusing them of losing his family photos.

    Steven Carmicle filed suit against Taylor County Jailer Rick Benningfield, Captain Kevin Wilson, Sgt. Jon Hawkins and Class D Coordinator Mary Cox in Taylor Circuit Court on Thursday, Sept. 3.

    In his handwritten complaint, Carmicle alleges that Hawkins placed him in solitary confinement. While in confinement, Carmicle states, Hawkins allegedly took his personal property to a jail property room.

  • Family says it's time to 'give back'

    Without March of Dimes' research, Anne Gibbs says her twin baby girls - who were born 16 weeks early on Feb. 22 - would not have survived.

    And now, Gibbs and her husband, Chris, are doing their part to give back to the organization, which strives to improve the health of babies by preventing birth defects, premature birth and infant mortality through research, community services, education and advocacy.

    The Gibbs babies, Julie and Maddie, have been named the ambassador babies for this year's local March of Dimes' March for Babies event.

  • Jail gets federal money for security cameras

    The Taylor County Detention Center will receive federal dollars to buy security cameras.

    The jail will receive a $6,898 Justice Assistance Grant award, according to the Justice and Public Safety Cabinet.

    The grant is part of nearly $5 million in federal and state funds awarded to police departments, sheriff's departments and other criminal justice agencies across the commonwealth last week

    Though the money was initially earmarked for extra beds, Taylor County Jailer Rick Benningfield said, the money will now be used to purchase 11 security cameras.

  • Judge vacancy posted

    The Kentucky Court of Justice posted a notice recently that the judge's seat currently filled by Senior Status Judge Doughlas M. George in the 11th Judicial Circuit, Division One, is now vacant.

    George officially resigned his seat Jan. 31 when he entered the Senior Status program. He has been appointed a special judge each month since and will continue to serve the 11th Judicial Circuit, which includes Taylor, Green, Marion and Washington counties, until a replacement is named.

  • Playing it Safe

    All it takes is a split second for a simple job on the farm to turn deadly. Russell Skaggs knows this all too well.

    Skaggs' father, Calvin, was killed on Aug. 7, 1992, in a farm incident.

    The skies that day were overcast, Skaggs said. Rain was on the way and Skaggs' father was trying to finish up.

    But his tractor couldn't handle the heavy load he was pulling. It jackknifed and the load pushed it over a hill. The tractor overturned, pinning Calvin underneath. He was pronounced dead shortly after.