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Today's News

  • Alves, Adcock, Decker, Edwards in spotlight

     

  • Early Days June 11, 2015

    TEN YEARS AGO

    June 9, 2005

    This year, the local Crusade for Children drive raised $34,750.36 - more than 12 percent over last year - with the help of more than 125 volunteers.

    The 2005 Taylor County Relay For Life begins Friday evening at the Taylor County High School track.

    Jane P. Chappell has been appointed vice president of Ratheon and will be based in the Dallas area.

    Bill Sanders has been named new sales manager for James Medical Equipment, effective May 16.  

  • Dabney earns all-state softball honors

     

    Campbellsville High School senior-to-be Paige Dabney has been named to the Class A All-State Softball Team.
    Dabney won 16 of the Lady Eagles’ games this season while pitching 170 innings.
    At the plate, Dabney was one of the state’s top hitters with a .680 batting average, which included 66 hits, 11 home runs, 51 runs batted in and 18 doubles.
    Coach Weston Jones’ CHS squad finished the season with an 18-13 worksheet.

  • About 1,200 attend Kids Outdoor Day

     

    At least 1,200 people came out to Green River Lake Saturday for the 15th annual Kids Outdoor Day.

    "I think it is probably as good as last year," said Taylor County Judge/Executive Eddie Rogers, who participated. "What a perfect day for weather. "What else better can you do for the kids than have a day out for them to see what kind of sport activities there are out here?"

  • CU, KU answer Grider lawsuit

     

    Both Campbellsville University and Kentucky Utilities deny culpability in the electrocution accident last year that led to the death of firefighter Tony Grider.

    Last month, Grider's widow, Gina Grider, filed a lawsuit against KU, CU and Pierce Manufacturing, the company that built the aerial bucket truck used in the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge that day.

  • Former city council member Kibbons dies at 84

     

    A true friend and the epitome of a servant leader.

    That is how Dr. Dwayne Howell described Dr. Jerry Ray Kibbons, who died this past Saturday in Lexington, Ky. He was 84.

    Howell, a 1982 graduate of Campbellsville College who now serves as professor of Old Testament and Hebrew at Campbellsville University, called Kibbons his mentor and friend for close to 40 years.

    Howell delivered the message at Kibbons' funeral Wednesday at Parrott & Ramsey Funeral Home.

  • Campbellsville Police to ‘arrest’ local celebrities on Friday, June 12

    The Campbellsville Department will host its inaugural “Arrest of Local Celebrities” on Friday, June 12, starting at 10 a.m.

    The event is aimed toward raising funds for the Lake Cumberland Children’s Advocacy Center. Located in Jamestown, Ky., the center is used as a bridge between law enforcement and children who are victims of a crime.

  • Relay for Life set for Friday

    In an effort to find a cure for cancer, Taylor County’s annual Relay for Life event will take place at the Taylor County High School football field on Friday, June 12, starting at 7 p.m., and running until Saturday, June 13 at 3 a.m.

    Drew Underwood is the event leader for this year’s Relay for Life. He said that although Relay is a one-night event, the work that makes it possible takes place all year long, and it helps in many ways.

  • Two arrested, found in possesssion of meth

    Two Liberty, Ky., residents were arrested recently on KY 70 by the Taylor County Sheriff’s Office, according to a TCSO report.

    Melissa White, 40, of Griffith Ridge Road in Liberty, was arrested on charges of first-degree possession of a controlled substance – methamphetamine; possession of drug paraphernalia, possession of a prescription controlled substance not in original container - first offense; and driving under the influence of drugs.

    Justin Atwood, 23, also of Liberty, was arrested on a Casey County arrest warrant.

  • John McLean wins Agribusiness Person of the Year

    Even though he got his start as a poultry farmer — and still works in that field — John McLean considers himself more of a bio-gas farmer these days.

    That’s because, for the last four years, he has been putting much of his time and energy into his on-site bio-gas plant.

    But what started as a project built around curiosity has blossomed into one centered on passion.

    “My heart is in my bio-gas plant,” McLean said. “I believe we can be so much more efficient in so many ways.”