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Today's News

  • Blood shortage leaves need for more donors

     

    "They say it's the gift of life, right?" he says.

    Mike Hunt of Campbellsville has O negative blood, the universal type. As such, he regularly donates.

    Hunt and about 40 other people donated blood last Thursday to honor Max Sutton, who died in May after battling a form of blood cancer. He was 68.

    And last Thursday's drive couldn't have come at a better time. The American Red Cross issued a call last week, stating that a blood shortage is looming and donors are urgently needed.

  • Dress codes announced for county, city schools

     

    When they head back to school in a few days, local students need to know what they can and can't wear to class.

    Most of the local schools haven't made any changes in their dress codes for this school year.

    Local principals say they tend to not have trouble with students abiding by the dress codes. Nevertheless, punishments are in place for those who don't abide by the rules.

  • Former deputy's sentencing delayed due to his vacation

     

    The former sheriff's deputy who broke the law he was hired to uphold wasn't sentenced in federal court last week as planned. This time, his sentencing was delayed because he is on vacation.

    But when he is sentenced in two weeks, Billy Rice faces as much as 30 years in federal prison and a large fine.

    Rice, a former Taylor County Sheriff's Deputy, of Campbellsville, was charged in early October with committing federal drug crimes. He had initially pleaded not guilty, but has since entered a guilty plea to the charges.

  • Water Fight!

     

    The water was flying at Taylor County Public Library on Friday afternoon, and it was every man for himself to stay dry.

    When the library began its summer reading program this year, staff members set a goal for participants to read 1,000 books. When the final tally was in, the children and teens participating read four times that amount.

    For surpassing the goal, library staff members promised they would participate in a water fight, pitting the staff against the children.

  • Resident enters guilty plea to sex crimes

     

    A Campbellsville man has pleaded guilty to sodomizing and abusing a child and could spend 23 years in prison for his crimes.

    In October, Charles Ray Shepperson, 39, of 100 Layton Drive, was indicted by a Taylor County grand jury and charged with two counts of a sex-related crime and two counts each of first-degree sodomy and first-degree sexual abuse of a child younger than 12.

    According to the indictment, Shepperson allegedly forced a child to have sexual contact with him on at least two occasions between May and June 2013.

  • Cocanougher withdraws from circuit judge's race

     

    Tim Cocanougher of Springfield, candidate for the Circuit Court Judge in the 11th Judicial Circuit, District 1, withdrew his candidacy on Monday, citing a recent opportunity to continue his work conducting sexual assault investigations for the United States military.

    A former Commonwealth's attorney, Cocanougher said his view of the judge's seat as a very respectable and highly esteemed position influenced his decision to file.

  • Durham to use mental defense in murder trial

     

    Jesse Durham has filed notice that he will use a mental health defense in his murder case.

    Durham, 22, is accused of killing his great-grandmother, Elizabeth Arinsmier, with a hammer. He has pleaded not guilty to murder, which carries a sentence of as much as life in prison.

    Earlier this month, Durham's attorney, C.B. Bates of the Department of Public Advocacy in Columbia, announced that the case is prepared for trial.

  • Students participate in book focus group

     

    Campbellsville and Taylor County middle school students recently offered a Campbellsville native some feedback on his soon-to-be published novel.

    Deronte' Smith, who lives in Georgia but is originally from Campbellsville, met with the students last week after they read his book "The Fantastical Adventures of Sleepy Steve: Reuniting the Stone."

    The book was published a few years ago, but has been expanded and rewritten. The book is slated to be published this fall and is in consideration to become a television show.

  • Gardening keeps Bailey going strong at 83

     

    Standing among the blooms of bright pink, deep orange and golden yellow, Martha Evelyn Bailey said sometimes even she wonders where all the flowers have come from.

    She tends to her garden all day long, six days a week, stopping only for a quick bite of lunch before heading back outside again. She takes a break on Sunday, but still makes sure to water her flowers.

    Although she is very tired at night, Bailey said several years of working in a garden is what keeps her in good health and spirits at age 83.

  • Schools give advice for supply list purchases

     

    She has a decision to make. It's either the purple pencil pouch or the pink one.

    After much thought, she puts the purple one in her cart. With that item checked off the list, she turns her attention to notebooks.

    With the start of school now just days away, many students are headed to stores in search of school clothing and supplies.

    Students in local school systems can find supply lists at school, local stores and online. Read about this year's dress codes in Monday's issue.