.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's News

  • Man allegedly threatens officers with knife

     

    A Campbellsville man has been arrested and charged after he allegedly threatened police officers with a knife.

    Campbellsville Police received a call on Sunday at 1:40 a.m. from Constable James Gaddis asking for help at Elmhurst Plaza.

    The report states that Gaddis had made contact with a white male who had been walking in the westbound lane on Broadway.

  • For 27 years, Sanders has been answering the call at 911 center

     

    Anne Sanders has spent a large part of her professional career talking on the phone. But her conversations haven't been to catch up with friends or make business deals, they have been to help people in need.

    Sanders, who serves as supervisor at Campbellsville/Taylor County E-911 Center, recently celebrated 27 years on the job.

    Born and raised in Taylor County, Sanders graduated from Taylor County High School and attended then Campbellsville College to study business. But she soon found another calling.

  • Back-to-school tips for parents, students

     

    Students will head back to the classroom in about three weeks.

    But before then, there are lots of items on their to-do list. For some students, one of those items includes getting exams and shots.

    Dr. Michael Hesson of University of Louisville Pediatrics in Campbellsville said parents must make sure their children are healthy and ready for school. He said it's important that all children are up-to-date on their vaccinations and at a healthy weight.

  • Bridge construction begins on Palestine Road
  • Senator visits The Healing Place

     

    As they kick the habit, they focus on becoming productive members of society. And next, they work on making their dreams become a reality.

    “Dreams we never thought possible for ourselves,” he said.

    Shawn Hankins, who serves as intake/transition coordinator at The Healing Place in Campbellsville, says those who come to the recovery center learn life skills to better themselves.

  • Mayor gives State of the City address

     

    The city's finances are in healthier shape than they ever have been, the city's head official told the crowd.

    And, according to its recent financial audit, Campbellsville Mayor Tony Young says the city's financial net position has improved by $1.9 million in the last year.

    Building the city's finances while saving taxpayers' money was at the forefront of Young's annual State of the City address at the Campbellsville/Taylor County Chamber of Commerce luncheon last Thursday.

  • Animal Tales

     

    There was a bird, reptile, mammal, amphibian and invertebrate at the library last week. And local children got a close encounter with each of them.

    Animal Tales presented an "Animal Science" program at Taylor County Public Library last Thursday as part of its summer reading activities.

    Keith Wood, a naturalist with Animal Tales, explained facts about each animal and let children touch a large Burmese python that took six people to hold.

  • Sex offender indicted again

     

    A Campbellsville man, who is a lifetime registered sex offender, has again been accused of sexually abusing a young girl.

    Ronald Eugene Osinger Jr., 34, of 211 E. Hord St., was indicted last Tuesday by a Taylor County grand jury.

    Osinger, who in 2004 was sentenced to serve 10 years in prison for rape, sodomy, sexual abuse and intimidating a witness, has been charged with first-degree sexual abuse of a child younger than 12 and being a first-degree persistent felony offender. Bond was set at $20,000 cash.

  • In the Garden

     

    After weeks of labor, the plants are starting to bear fruit.

    Taylor County Public Library began a garden in May and local children have helped tend to it on several Fridays since.

    Last Friday, the children met for the last official gardening day, but those still interesting in pitching in with watering, weeding and picking can stop by the library.

  • New laws go into effect tomorrow

    Starting tomorrow, Kentuckians will have a few more laws to abide by.

    Lawmakers discussed many pieces of legislation during their General Assembly session earlier this year. Many were passed, but others never saw any action.

    According to the Legislative Research Commission, the commonwealth's constitution states that new laws take effect 90 days after legislators adjourn, except for those containing emergency clauses.

    This year's session adjourned on April 15, making tomorrow the day most new laws will go into effect.