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Local News

  • Man leads police on chase

    A Campbellsville man was arrested and charged after he allegedly led police on a chase early Sunday morning.

    According to a Campbellsville Police report, Officer Jacob Hedgespeth attempted to stop a vehicle at about 1:10 a.m. on Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard that nearly struck him head-on.

    The report states that the driver failed to stop after Hedgespeth initiated his emergency equipment.

    After a short pursuit, Hedgespeth was able to stop the vehicle, which was being driven by John M. Smith, 44, of Campbellsville.

  • Man charged with assault

     

    A Campbellsville man has been arrested and charged with assaulting another man.

    DeMichael Calhoun, 39, of Bell Court, was arrested on Friday at 10:53 a.m.

    According to Calhoun's arrest citation, he allegedly assaulted another man by punching him in the face.

    Court records state that the man had an apparent serious injury to his right eye and needed medical treatment. The man's eye was swollen, court records state, and bleeding steadily. Records state that the man's eye socket was possibly broken.

  • Congressman's ethics questioned

     

    He has denied any wrongdoing, and says the complaint has been filed as an attack against him for gaining support for one of his bills.

    U.S. Rep. Ed Whitfield, R-Ky., has become the subject of an ethics investigation.

    According to a news release from Whitfield's office, several lawmakers recently filed an ethics complaint against him with the House Ethics Committee.

  • Driver's license extension granted

    Even though Kentucky's driver's licenses aren't entirely compliant with federal regulations, Taylor Countians' licenses are still valid and residents don't need to do anything.

    Efforts are ongoing to ensure the licenses become compliant, and changes are being considered to the way the state issues them.

  • Deaths by heroin overdose on the rise

    While the number of overdoses in Kentucky seems to be staying steady, the number of those who died from heroin use has increased exponentially.

    In Taylor County, the number of overdoses has also stayed steady, and local law enforcement officials say they are always working to eliminate illegal drugs from the streets.

    An Office of Drug Control Policy report states that there were 1,007 drug-related overdose deaths in 2013, compared to 1,004 in 2012.

  • Judicial Center floods

     

    Campbellsville Fire & Rescue personnel were called to the Taylor County Judicial Center on Tuesday afternoon at about 4 p.m. after a sprinkler was broken and water began to flood the building.

    An inmate allegedly broke the sprinkler while being housed in a holding cell.

    Water flowed at 35 gallons a minute and spread to courtrooms, hallways and stairwells.

    Officials at the scene said the inmate will face felony criminal mischief charges.

  • Marion County man arrested following police chase

     

     

    A Marion County man has been arrested and charged following a police chase that started in Bradfordsville and ended in a wooded area in Mannsville on Monday night.

    Marion County Sheriff Jimmy Clements said a bench warrant had been issued for Ricky L. Garrett, 28, of St. Ann Street in Lebanon after he failed to appear for a probation revocation hearing.

  • Work progresses on Palestine Bridge
  • Schools using new leadership program

     

    When students head back to school in a few days, they won't just be learning their core subjects. They will also learn to become leaders.

    Students at Campbellsville and Taylor County schools will participate in the Leader in Me program this year, based on author Stephen Covey's book "The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People." The habits are listed in a sidebar to this story.

  • Few make plans for digital assets after death

     Most people plan what will happen to their children, property and other personal belongings after their death. But few might think to specify what is to happen to their email and other digital assets, from their Facebook and Twitter accounts to their online photo galleries.

    “What do you do with that?” Tony Smith, who serves as the IT specialist for Taylor County government, said. The Uniform Law Commission might have an answer.