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Local News

  • Summer Veggies

    Fresh cantaloupe, watermelon, corn, tomatoes and beans. For those looking for some homegrown foods, ready-to-eat summer vegetables are available now at the Taylor County Farmers' Market.

    The market is open from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. each Saturday and, according to Darrell Bunnell, president of the farmers' market association, vendors have about every fruit and vegetable in season available for purchase.

    The farmers' market building is located just off KY 210 on the left past Walmart, near the Taylor County Animal Shelter.

  • Committee will discuss EDA

    A meeting of a new committee to examine the Economic Development Authority has yet to be scheduled but could happen soon.

    City Councilman David Nunery said he has taken initiative to schedule a committee meeting. Nunery and Councilman Stan McKinney are the Campbellsville City Council representatives for the group. Magistrates Tommy Corbin and Matt Pendleton are the Taylor Fiscal Court representatives.

    The committee also includes two EDA representatives, though they have yet to be appointed.

  • What to wear?

    Like it or not, most schools have dress codes today, and every student is expected to follow them.

    Campbellsville Independent and Taylor County public schools and Kentucky Christian Academy have finalized their polices and sent copies home to parents.

    Administrators from the local schools all say students should be aware of the policies, though there have been little or no changes to most of the policies.

    Also, schools have announced that lunch prices remain the same for the upcoming year.

  • Pike makes sculpture

     

    Valerie Michelle Pike, 17, of Campbellsville completed this anime sculpture. Pike, a home-schooled senior, is the daughter of Ed and Marcenia Pike. They attend Saloma Baptist Church.

  • Money tips for college students

    College students should have a budget, and it is not a bad idea for high school students either.

    A budget is a tool for tracking the money you make compared with the money you spend. Many people would say a budget is a spending plan, but that doesn't take into account savings or investments. So, let's consider it a money plan.

  • Local high school coordinator accepting host family applications

    Kathleen Lesperance, international exchange coordinator for the nonprofit Education First (EF) Foundation for Foreign Study, the leader in high school exchange, is currently accepting applications for host families for the 2011-2012 school year.

  • BackPack Program in need of adoptions for 2011-12 school year

    According to the 2010 Hunger Study, one in every four Kentucky children is living in poverty.

    Feeding America, Kentucky's Heartland is making huge strides in providing food to at-risk children in Central and South Central Kentucky through its BackPack Program.

    The BackPack Program is a weekly take-home food program for children identified by school officials for being at-risk of being hungry on the weekends when school meals are unavailable.

  • TCHS band selling sponsorships

    Taylor County High School band is selling sponsorships, with proceeds going toward the cost of lettering and upkeep of an equipment trailer for the Taylor County Marching Cardinals.

    The marching Cardinals placed third in Class 3A at the KMEA State Marching Band Competition last year, which was the best showing of any TCHS band in the history of the school.

    There are two levels of sponsorship.

  • Campbellsville residents receives pharmacy degrees

    Two Campbellsville residents recently received doctor of pharmacy degrees.

    John Wilcher, the son of Roger and Deborah Bast, and Danielle Smith, the daughter of Danny and Melissa Williams, were awarded degrees from the University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy at commencement on May 8.

    The University of Kentucky College of Pharmacy honored 133 students at the ceremony at the UK Singletary Center for the Arts.

  • LWC offers free classes to area senior citizens

    Area senior citizens can learn Japanese, how to direct a play, explore women's studies and study the Old Testament this fall at Lindsey Wilson College.

    And the cost of the courses is free.

    As part of the LWC Senior Scholars Program, area residents who are 62 years or older may take one undergraduate class this fall with no tuition expense. Senior Scholars must pay for books and supplies for their class.