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Local News

  • Local physicians are members of Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society

    Taylor Regional Hospital recently announced that there are five local physicians who have been chosen as members of Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honor Society.  
    The five include Dr. James Angel, urology; Dr. Graham Englund, general surgery; Dr. Kellee Frogge, family practice; Dr. Eugene Shively, general surgery; and Dr. James Watkins, general surgery.

  • Extension office expansion opens to public Sunday

     

    One of the community’s popular meeting places now has twice the space it once had.

    A project a year in the making, Taylor County Extension Office has completed an expansion of its building. And the office will host an open house on Sunday to show off its new digs.

    Becky Nash, cooperative extension agent for family and consumer sciences, said expanding the extension office’s building was always the plan.

  • Gabehart celebrates 40 years as Lee's employee

     

    Though Lee’s Famous Recipe is located in the same spot as it was 40 years ago, there was no Broadway Avenue when it opened.

    Back then, brothers, and future Lee’s owners, J. Paul and David Newton, were still in school. The restaurant was smaller back then, too.

    But today, one thing remains the same at Lee’s. Shirley Gabehart is working the front counter, greeting customers with a smile just as she did four decades ago.

  • Animal shelter talks continue between SPCA group, county

    The documents haven’t been updated since 1999, but a committee will soon study the policies and procedures of the Taylor County Animal Shelter in an attempt to get them up-to-date again.

    The shelter has been the subject of many meetings lately, after allegations surfaced last November that inmates were told to bury animals alive on shelter property. The allegations have been denied and inmates are no longer used at the shelter. The shelter was again discussed at Tuesday’s regular Taylor County Fiscal Court meeting.

  • CLARCOR to close its doors


    The sign is a bit faded, perhaps indicative of what has happened there.

    Air filter manufacturer CLARCOR announced on Monday that it will close up shop. And as a result, 71 employees will lose their jobs.


    In a letter written to Taylor County Judge/Executive Eddie Rogers, Paul Marold, president of CLARCOR, stated that the closing involves the entire Campbellsville plant and is expected to be permanent.

  • January is National Blood Donor Month

     

    It has been described as one of the easiest ways to help another person. And many Taylor County residents have pitched in to help, time after time.
    January is National Blood Donor Month.

    In a news release last month, American Red Cross officials stated that they are using the month to celebrate contributions from millions of blood donors who have given patients hope.

  • Budget will dominate General Assembly


    The state’s budget and gaming will take center stage during the 2012 General Assembly.

    State Rep. John “Bam” Carney, R-Campbellsville, and State Sen. Jimmy Higdon, R-Lebanon, were both hard at work last week during the opening days of the 60-day session, which kicks into high gear this week.

    Both say the major issues for the 2012 session will be the budget, redistricting, gaming and fighting pill mills.

    Of course, they say, the budget is the top priority.

  • Number of fatal crashes rises in 2011

    A bit tattered, the ribbon hung with care on the small wooden cross sways in the breeze as a car passes. Though the colors are a bit faded, the memory of the person the cross represents likely hasn’t.

    Wooden crosses can be seen throughout Taylor County on the sides of roads as makeshift memorials for loved ones lost in motor vehicle crashes.

    Ten people died last year in Taylor County as the result of injuries from motor vehicle collisions, up exponentially from the two who died in 2010 and in 2009.

  • EDA committee approves debt plan

    The committee charged with resolving the Economic Development Authority’s land debt has approved a plan.

  • Underwood is county's new advocate for crime victims


    From working at a clothing store, day care and hospital to now advocating for the victims of crimes, Andrea Underwood says she wants to help people.

    Underwood is Taylor County’s new victims’ advocate. Working in the Taylor County Attorney’s office, she replaces Leticia Salinas-Newton.

    In October, Salinas-Newton, who had served in the position since 2008, said she was giving up the title to take a break from the job. She is now working at the Bertram, Cox & Miller law firm.