Local News

  • New credit card rules seek to protect consumers

    The Federal Reserve has imposed new regulations on credit card companies, and that translates into more protection for consumers, local experts say.

    Approved by the Federal Reserve Board in January, the new rules went into effect on Feb. 22.

    In short, the new requirements means credit card companies will be forced to provide more information to customers such as advance warning of rate or fee increases and just how long it will take to pay off balances.

  • State considers cutting two school days

    Could Kentucky's public schools become a system of haves and have-nots?

    That's the question being asked among school administrators as legislators hash out plans to reverse the state's projected $1.2 billion shortfall.

    Among the possibilities is cutting two days from the school calendar, a move that would save the state $40 million a year. The General Assembly opted to add the two days in 2006.

    But there are still questions as to what that would mean locally.

  • Sexual Assault Awareness Month: Education, awareness are key

    They can often take years to resolve, both to prosecute and to recover from.

    That's why a focus on education and prevention is planned for March - also known as Sexual Assault Awareness Month.

    A ceremony in Frankfort last Thursday kicked off the month, which is geared toward education and prevention.

    Several sexual assaults are reported in Campbellsville each year.

    Campbellsville Police Chief Dennis Benningfield says sexual assaults can include allegations of rape, sodomy, sexual abuse or sexual misconduct.

  • Man accused of stealing another's van

    A Campbellsville man has been arrested and charged after he allegedly stole a van and led police on a chase.

    Damiamo Romonda Brown, 23, of 703 N. Columbia Ave. was arrested at 12:41 a.m. Monday, Feb. 22.

    According to Brown's arrest citation, Campbellsville Police responded to a stolen vehicle report from a home on Durham Street.

    While an officer was at the scene of the theft, court records state, Campbellsville Police Officer Tim Coppage saw a van matching the description of the one reported stolen and began to follow the driver.

  • Statewide tornado drill is Tuesday

    At 10:07 a.m. Tuesday, Taylor County will participate in a statewide tornado drill.

    As a part of Severe Storms Preparedness Month activities, the National Weather Service will conduct a tornado test that will activate NOAA weather radios and broadcast media, which will allow schools, businesses and residents across the state to participate in the annual tornado safety drill.

    In Campbellsville, the Fire Department siren will sound seven times to signify this test warning.


  • Scholarships available for students in medical field

    Those seeking a career in medicine have a chance to apply for some money to help them reach their goals.

    Applications are now being accepted for the Dr. William H. Olson Scholarship. And, according to managing trustee Mark Johnson, those who apply and receive an award can receive it for four years.

    Olson was educated at Harvard Medical School, completed his medical internship at the Beth Israel Hospital in Boston, Mass. and was an associate professor of neurology and anatomy at Vanderbilt University of Medicine.

  • Civil Rights Hall of Fame nominations sought

    The Kentucky Commission on Human Rights is seeking nominations for the 2010 Kentucky Civil Rights Hall of Fame. Nominations are being accepted until June 15.

    Eighty-seven individuals have been inducted since the first Civil Rights Hall of Fame ceremony in 2000. The ceremony to honor new inductees will be in October in Louisville. Details will be announced later.

  • Nickel tax focus of meeting

    Educators past and present banded together Tuesday night to drum up support for Taylor County School District's recallable nickel tax.

    Taylor County School Board members unanimously approved the nickel tax during their regular meeting on Tuesday, Feb. 9.

    By that Friday, a petition opposing Taylor County School Board's approval of a recallable nickel tax began circulating door to door.

  • 'We're still making history.'

    Truth is power. Truth will set you free. That was the idea behind the Rev. Mac Pendleton's message at the Taylor County Civic League's 21st Annual Black History Program on Sunday night.

    Pendleton, pastor of Bethel AME Church, was the guest speaker.

    "To be free, you must know the truth," Pendleton said. "To know the truth, you must know Jesus."

    Pendleton said black people may be free but, "We have not taken the chains off our minds," referring to what he called "psychological slavery."

  • Tax rolls going online

    The Taylor County PVA office is going online.

    And, for those who use Taylor County's tax rolls regularly, that information will soon be available with a subscription and the click of a computer mouse.

    Deputy Property Valuation Administrator Chad Shively, who will oversee the site, says the PVA office's Web site, www.taylorpva.com, will go live on Monday and offer visitors lots of information about the office and its duties, as well as a subscription to view Taylor County's tax roll information.