Local News

  • Show choir highlights TV tunes

    From Bugs Bunny to "Friends," a cast and crew of more than 50 Taylor County High students will bring the history of TV music to the Taylor County Middle School stage.

    The Taylor County High School Show Choir will present its new show "Favorite TV Songs" beginning tonight at 7. The show will also be performed tomorrow and Saturday at 7 p.m. Tickets are $5. Doors open at 6 p.m.

  • Man files appeal of 14-year sentence

    The man accused of sodomizing a 6-year-old girl with a foreign object has asked that his 14-year prison sentence be set aside. A local judge denied the man's motion, and the case is now headed to the Kentucky Court of Appeals.

    Roy Roger Mace III, 26, of 700 Meader St. in Campbellsville was indicted in November 2004 by a Taylor County grand jury on two counts of first-degree sodomy and being a first-degree persistent felony offender.

  • Music for the Soul

    The sound of woodwinds, percussion and brass instruments filled Campbellsville High School's Hamilton Auditorium on Monday night.

    CHS hosted an area band concert, with Marion, Green and Taylor County bands all taking the stage. Campbellsville's band closed the concert with two songs.

    The event was free.

  • Building a 'green' house

    Dan Dougherty is building a "green" house. Not a place to grow his plants, but a home that will be so energy efficient that his goal is to have a $30 monthly electric bill.

    "I would call the house a kit," Dougherty said. "It came in three semis and within seven days it was up and airtight from cement to tarpaper. I could have slept in here if I had wanted to."

  • Fire leads to power outage

    A small fire at a substation left 1,060 Kentucky Utility customers without power Thursday.

    According to Cliff Feltham, KU statewide media relations manager, the outage occurred at 8:07 p.m.

    "The cause was equipment failure — an insulator on the substation transformer failed," he said. "There was a small fire involved as the insulator failed, which happens many times when we have this kind of an equipment failure, but it was contained to inside the fence of our substation."

  • Marion prisoner escapes

    Police are searching for a man who escaped from the Marion County Detention Center on Wednesday while on work detail.

    James H. Shell, 45, escaped at approximately 2:30 p.m. while on work release at the Marion County Animal Shelter.

    Shell is a 5'9," 250-pound white male with brown hair and brown eyes. Though he had a beard at the time the most recent photo was taken, he is now clean shaven.

    Shell is a diabetic and requires medication. He was being held for flagrant non-support.

  • Program shows teens the seriousness of drunk driving

    They watched in silence as the graphic scenes flashed before their eyes. For the entire 12 minutes, only a gasp was heard as a particularly grim photo was displayed, showing them just how dangerous drinking and driving can be.

    Campbellsville and Taylor County high school students heard a first-hand account Thursday morning about how alcohol can impair drivers.

    Taylor County's seniors and Campbellsville's juniors and seniors participated in the national Save a Life Tour's alcohol awareness program.

  • Lawmakers consider early release for prisoners

    A House state budget plan to release up to 2,000 non-violent felons has jailers across the state concerned about community safety and their budgets.

    "It's not the fact that we want to keep people in jail," said Taylor County Jailer Rick Benningfield. "It's letting people out that don't need to be. It's time to start thinking about safety instead of about budget."

  • One injured in crash

    One person was injured in a crash on U.S. 68 Tuesday afternoon. No further information was available  at press time.

  • Early detection can save lives

    Early detection can be the key to surviving cancer. Just ask Chris Naylor.

    "If we hadn't caught it early, and without God's help, I wouldn't be here to talk about it," she says.

    That's why each March is designated as Colon Cancer Prevention Month.

    Campbellsville surgeon Eugene H. Shively says no one knows what causes colon cancer, but it's one of the most deadly cancers. However, if it is caught in the early stages, it can be treated.