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Local News

  • Woman files suit against TRH

    A Campbellsville resident has filed suit against Taylor Regional Hospital and a Somerset doctor, alleging that they caused her permanent injuries.

    Lebanon attorney Ted Lavit filed a complaint Thursday, Sept. 24 in Taylor Circuit Court on behalf of Tammy Stephens against Taylor County Hospital District Health Facilities Corp. and Dr. James M. Martin of Lake Cumberland Regional Hospital in Somerset.

    According to Stephens' complaint, she received medical treatment from the two defendants on Sept. 15 through Oct. 25 of last year.

  • Phone scam targets elderly

    The Kentucky State Police Post 15 are investigating a new phone scam.

    The scam involves calls to someone, generally an elderly person, with callers saying they are a family member, out of town and that they have been arrested. The caller tells the victim that they need money wired to them via Western Union to pay bail and fines.

    Similar scams are being reported to other local authorities and callers are advised to disregard any such call unless they know for certain a family member has been arrested.

  • BBB warns of two fake businesses

    The Better Business Bureau is warning consumers about two companies that claim to be Louisville-based businesses, but they are actually scams.

    Consumers across the country are contacting the BBB of Louisville, Southern Indiana and Western Kentucky to inquire about these "companies."

    JC Henning

    BBB has received more than 100 inquiries on JC Henning Inc. from across the country.

  • Illness forces both districts to close school

    Fall break came early for students at both local school systems, though a number of those students may spend the break recovering from illnesses.

    Both local districts canceled classes this week after daily attendance rates dropped.

    With the attendance rate down to 85 percent on Monday, Taylor County Schools Superintendent Roger Cook said classes would be canceled for the remainder of the week. With Taylor County's fall break set to begin today, students will not return to class until Monday, Oct. 12.

  • Braving the Rain

    They huddled under the pavilion and tackled other business first in hopes that the rain would stop and the march could start.

    The more than 40 people who attended the March of Dimes' March for Babies fundraiser on Saturday at Veterans Memorial Park listened to families' stories, took part in an auction and won prizes.

    Anne Gibbs spoke of her family's gratitude toward the March of Dimes and its part in saving the lives of her children.

  • New church focuses on reclaiming families

    The idea came to him in a dream. A little more than a year later, that idea became a reality. And three weeks ago, a worship center opened and its first service attracted about 45 people.

    It all began in March 2008, when the Rev. Jeff Newton had a dream about a turtle without a shell. He said he begin to think about how a shell offers protection and wondered if the dream might mean someone from his church was planning to leave.

    That person turned out to be him.

  • Groups help local family

    The echo of steadily pounding hammers could be heard from far away. Sawdust and the smell of freshly cut wood floated in the light breeze. And the atmosphere was one of giving back to the community.

    The hammers and wood eventually created two new decks for a Taylor County family, built by Campbellsville University students, Kentucky Heartland Outreach personnel and volunteers from Lowe's.

  • BREAKING NEWS: Campbellsville Schools closes remainder of week

    With attendance rates down Tuesday, Campbellsville School Superintendent Mike Deaton made the decision to cancel classes for the rest of the week.

    On Tuesday morning, Deaton said the elementary school has been hit the hardest.

    Taylor County School Superintendent Roger Cook canceled classes for his students after attendance was down on Monday.

    With fall break next week, students will not return to class until Monday, Oct. 12.

    Both Deaton and Cook said they hope the long break will provide ample time for the illnesses to run their course.

  • Schools see mixed results on annual tests

    This year's No Child Left Behind data has left some mixed results for local school systems. Some scores are up, but several schools have been ruled as not making adequate yearly progress.

    NCLB results were released last week, along with an interim performance report that replaces CATS results. Signed into law in January 2002, the federal NCLB Act requires states to provide information on districts' progress to reach proficiency by 2014.

  • 'Summer Memories'

    The Friends of the Taylor County Public Library hosted a free "summer memories" event Thursday.

    Though attendance was down, many activities were available, including summertime stories, crafts for children to give to their teachers, snacks and a scrapbook page for photos from summer vacations.

    The library's event next month will be a tailgate party with Campbellsville University football players.

    For more information, call the library at 465-2562.