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Local News

  • Three charged in sealed indictments

    Three Campbellsville residents have been charged with drug crimes in four indictments recently unsealed by a Taylor Circuit Court judge.

    A grand jury may seal an indictment if there is a possibility that the accused will try to evade police.

    Indicted were:

  • Enrollment on target at local schools

    Enrollment at local schools is on target, and officials expect those numbers to increase even more as the school year continues.

    At the Campbellsville Independent School District, enrollment stands at 1,075. Last year, the figure was 1,093.

    At Campbellsville Elementary School, according to Campbellsville Independent Superintendent Mike Deaton, enrollment is the highest it has been in at least a decade, at 493 students. The District also boasts 38 preschool students, which is almost at its capacity, Deaton said.

  • CU reserves motel rooms

    There may not be as many local motel rooms available in the coming weeks.

    Campbellsville University will reserve several rooms at Best Western for the start of the fall semester, which begins Monday, Aug. 24.

    According to Dave Walters, CU's vice president for admissions and student services, the university tries every year to make sure it is prepared to accommodate its students.

  • Juniors improve ACT scores

    Statewide ACT composite scores are down slightly, but Campbellsville and Taylor County juniors bucked the trend, increasing composite scores and making gains in almost every subject.

    State results from the March 2009 administration of the ACT to Kentucky's public school juniors show a small improvement in mathematics, but minor drops or flat scores in other subjects, forming a statewide composite of 18.2. The 2008 composite was 18.3.

  • Court considers speed limit ordinance

    Magistrates may soon consider adopting a uniform system for setting speed limits on county roads.

    At last week's regular Fiscal Court meeting, magistrates unanimously had first reading of an ordinance changing the speed limit on Stewarts Lane from 15 to 25 mph.

    After that approval, Taylor County Attorney Craig Cox said the Taylor County Sheriff's Office has indicated that it is sometimes difficult to tell what the speed limit is on some of the county's roads.

  • Resident charged with DUI

    A Campbellsville resident has been arrested and charged with his second DUI after he allegedly drove under the influence and struck a pole.

    Gary L. Smothers, 53, of 1673 St. Matthews Cemetery Road was arrested Tuesday, Aug. 11 at 9:58 p.m.

    According to Smothers' arrest citation, the Taylor County Sheriff's Office received a complaint of a vehicle in a ditch on KY 527.

  • Police investigate phone scam

    Campbellsville Police are investigating a phone scam.

    According to a press release, several Taylor County residents have received calls from someone telling them they are being assigned a new Social Security number.

    The caller requests their current Social Security number as well as the name of their bank and their bank account number. The callers have represented themselves as working for Pete Bossner ID Theft Protection.

  • It's the Balloon Man!

    All that could be heard were children's squeals of joy followed by an occasional pop ... and then silence.

    Balloon animal maker Leland Pike of Brandenburg made penguins, cats, Viking hats and more for area children Thursday night at the Taylor County Public Library.

    Dozens of children attended the event, which was hosted by the Friends of the Library group. The Friends' group hosts an event each month at the TCPL. Next month, the group will host grandparents' night.

  • Guthrie's Traveling Help Desk to visit Taylor County

    Congressman Brett Guthrie's Traveling Help Desk will visit Taylor County on Thursday, Aug. 27 from 3 to 4 p.m. in the Taylor County District Courtroom in Campbellsville. 

    Field Representative Phyllis Causey will be available to meet with constituents personally and help with concerns. No appointments are necessary. 

  • Youth get a taste of work in summer program

    It helped dozens of local teens and young adults get a taste of the working life. It also gave businesses some free help for the summer.

    More than 50 young people worked at numerous community businesses in Kentucky's Summer Youth Employment Program.