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Local News

  • How much do they earn?

    Elected officials not only serve the people, they are also paid by the people. Local tax dollars fund local salaries. So, how much do the local officials up for re-election this year earn?

    The salaries of most elected officials are set by the state and follow a scale based on experience and the population of the county or city they govern.

    Salaries for judge/executive, mayor, county clerk, sheriff and jailers operating full-service jails are set by the Department for Local Government.

  • Turning lanes to be added on South Columbia

    A construction project to add turning lanes on South Columbia Avenue near Amazon.com will soon begin.

    On Tuesday night during the regular Taylor Fiscal Court meeting, magistrates accepted the remaining $115,000 of a total $315,000 in grant funding from the state Transportation Cabinet to build the turning lanes.

    Last month, magistrates accepted $200,000.

    Taylor County Judge/Executive Eddie Rogers said the City applied for grant funding for the project but was denied. He said the County applied and was approved.

  • Getting fit, staying fit

    It was all about getting fit and staying active.

    The third annual 2nd Sunday event was this past weekend on the North Bypass.

    Local organizer Becky Nash says 2nd Sunday is a statewide event that encourages all forms of physical activity within a local community and is designed to get Kentuckians moving.

    "The overall message is to bring attention to the need of exercise and to inspire people to change their lifestyle and to include more exercise."

    Taylor County's events were on the North Bypass between Reed Brothers Insurance and Trace Creek.

  • Textbook funding dropped

    The state has reduced the budget for textbooks at Campbellsville and Taylor County school districts to zero dollars this school year.

    For the 2008-2009 school year, Taylor County schools received $76,000 in textbook funds. For 2009-2010 school year, that figure was reduced to $10,000.

    But for the 2010-2011 year, the budget has been completely cut to nothing.

  • What are you thankful for?

    What are you most thankful for?

    The Central Kentucky News-Journal is sponsoring its annual Thanksgiving essay contest in which readers are asked to reflect on what they're thankful for in their lives.

    The winning essays will be published in the News-Journal on Thanksgiving Day.

    The theme of the contest asks readers to think about how they have been blessed and what they're most thankful for in their lives.

    A winner will be selected from three different age categories.

  • Election: Campbellsville City Council

    Sixteen candidates seek 12 seats on the Campbellsville City Council this year.

    Incumbents James E. "Jimmy" Ewing, Vangie Ford, W.M. "Mike" Hall Jr., Randall B. "Randy" Herron, Sharon Hoskins-Sanders, Richard Jeter, Terry W. Keltner, Stan McKinney, David Nunery and Patricia Phillips face challengers David Harris, Ricky Janes, Vicki Mullins, Greg Rice, Celia Williams and Teresa Turner.

    Twelve candidates will be elected.

    Incumbents Sue Smith and Paul Harmon did not file for re-election.

  • Man charged with DUI, growing marijuana

    A Campbellsville man has been arrested and charged with DUI and growing marijuana after the Taylor County Sheriff's Office received a tip that marijuana was being grown at a residence on Grimes Road.

    Roger L. Atwood, 43, of 234 Grimes Road was arrested at 7:55 p.m. Friday, Oct. 1.

    According to court records, Taylor County Sheriff's Deputy Dickie Benningfield received consent from the landowner to search Atwood's property and found two marijuana plants.

    Records state that the owner told Benningfield that Atwood was growing the plants.

  • Hedgespeth announces write-in candidacy for Taylor School Board

    Charles T. Hedgespeth has filed as a write-in candidate for the Taylor County School Board first District seat.

    Hedgespeth attended Taylor County Schools and, at age 18, moved to Illinois. He worked two years for CBQ Railroad and was drafted into the U.S. Air Force at 20. After completing basic training, he was transferred to Lowery Air Force Base and trained as a munitions expert. He served in Okinawa during the Korean Conflict and graduated from atomic weapons school and nuclear weapons school.

  • What are you thankful for?

    What are you most thankful for?

    The Central Kentucky News-Journal is sponsoring its annual Thanksgiving essay contest in which readers are asked to reflect on what they're thankful for in their lives.

    The winning essays will be published in the News-Journal on Thanksgiving Day.

    The theme of the contest asks readers to think about how they have been blessed and what they're most thankful for in their lives.

    A winner will be selected from three different age categories.

  • Man pleads guilty to elderly abuse

    The Campbellsville man charged with sodomizing a mentally incapacitated person has pleaded guilty to amended charges and may be sentenced to probation.

    Cecil Clay Stubbs, 69, of 104 Tharp Drive in Campbellsville was indicted last November and charged with 10 counts of second-degree sodomy.

    According to the indictments, Stubbs is accused of having sexual intercourse with another person who was mentally incapacitated on at least 10 occasions between Jan. 1, 2009, and March 12, 2009.

    Kentucky State Police Trooper David Smith investigated.