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Local News

  • Lieutenant governor speaks at CU convocation

    It’s good to have a plan for your life, but sometimes God’s plans aren’t your plans.

    That was the basic message that Kentucky Lt. Gov. Jenean Hampton (R) gave at a convocation service Wednesday morning at Campbellsville University’s Ransdell Chapel.

    “It was an interesting journey, for sure, and it was a journey that I didn’t plan,” Hampton said.

    Hampton, the first African-American to hold statewide office in Kentucky, was elected alongside Gov. Matt Bevin (R) on Nov. 3, 2015.

  • Long is new principal of primary center

    The family of the Taylor County Primary Center has been in its new building for a month now, and there is a familiar face leading them on their new journey.

    Melissa Long is the new principal at Taylor County Primary Center. Long had been the vice principal at Taylor County Elementary for the past 11 years.

    When the school decided to split, Long said she was “blessed with the opportunity for this position,” as Donna Williams moved into the Taylor County Intermediate School principal role.

  • Harmon releases audit of Taylor County Clerk’s Office

    An audit recently released by Kentucky Auditor Mike Harmon’s office for the Taylor County Clerk’s Office found no financial discrepancies.

    However, while the clerk’s office had no violations with regard to finances, the auditor’s office did find three faults with how the clerk’s office performs duties.

    Michael Goins of the state auditor’s office said those findings were the same ones that were found the previous year.

  • Good as gold

    Taylor County High School senior Ivy Neal is leaving a lasting mark at the new Taylor County Primary Center.

    The all-star senior created a large mural of the United States painted on the concrete courtyard at TCPC for her Girl Scout Gold Award project.

    The Gold Award represents the highest achievement in Girl Scouting, recognizing girls who demonstrate extraordinary leadership through remarkable ‘Take Action’ projects that have sustainable impact in their communities and beyond.

  • Local artist performs in Australia

    A local country artist made his way “Down Under” to perform in Australia’s largest music festival.

    Tony McKee can now add international performer to his list of achievements as he played for a crowd of more than 10,000 people at the Tamworth Country Music Festival on Saturday Jan. 21, and will again this Saturday. The festival lasts 10 days and has more than 700 artists. McKee said the festival is compared to the CMA Fest that is hosted in Nashville.

  • Livestock club offers different kind of learning

    The Taylor County Livestock Club is taking a new look at the livestock industry. 

    The special interest group being offered in Taylor County is giving children the opportunity to learn about animals, grain, and hay, and also improve their decision-making skills.

    “You don’t have to live on a farm to participate,” said Taylor County Extension Agent for 4-H/Youth Development Amanda Sublett.

    The group is open to anyone interested in farm animals, considering becoming a veterinarian or wanting to compete and travel the state.

  • ‘Quilts of Honor’ created for veterans

    When it comes to supporting veterans, some people join groups, host events or donate money to causes. But some quilt.

    There is a new organization in town wanting to offer a little something extra to those who have served our country. The Quilts of Honor Taylor County Chapter is the first chapter in Kentucky in the national Quilts of Honor program.

    The mission of Quilts of Honor is to bestow a universal symbol and token of thanks, solace, and remembrance to those who serve in harm’s way to protect and defend our lives and freedoms.

  • Can one person run county’s park?

    The Taylor County Fiscal Court will advertise for a parks director to oversee Veterans Memorial Park, the adjacent Community Center and other county properties.

    At a special-called meeting Monday evening, magistrates voted unanimously to advertise for the position. That advertisement appears in today’s paper on page A13. All applications will be due by the end of the day on Monday, Jan. 30.

  • Backpack program feeds hungry kids

    With the chilly season still looming, it makes it hard for some children to get a warm meal. But there is a program in Campbellsville and Taylor County that is helping feed hungry kids.

    The Campbellsville and Taylor County family resource centers began a Backpack Food Program in 2007.

    Students at both districts and at the combined Campbellsville/Taylor County Head Start can be referred to the program, and receive a bag of food to take home each weekend.

  • Comer meets with local industry leaders

    U.S. Rep. James Comer (R-First District) is going back to work today in Washington, D.C., but last week he met with industry leaders in Taylor and Marion counties.

    Comer said they plan to get a lot done in the first 200 days of President Donald Trump’s (R) term of office alongside the Republican-dominated 115th Congress, including a repeal and replacement of the Affordable Care Act.