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Local News

  • Music on the Courthouse Square

     

    They sang, clapped and danced along to the music.

    About 30 people gathered at Taylor County Courthouse Square on Friday night to hear some live music.

    Greater Campbellsville United sponsored the event, which featured local singers Yulanda Bradshaw, Mackie Jo Pennington and Jan Overstreet.

  • Doing our job to serve you

    Recently, the Central Kentucky News-Journal reported on a local official who was charged with an alcohol-related offense.

    Naturally, the CKNJ covered the story. That was our responsibility, and it's the same way we would handle any other public official in a similar situation. Still, we've heard some complaints, including people calling our office to cancel their subscription to the CKNJ because of the story.

  • Man charged with violating terms of sex offender registration

     

    A Campbellsville man has been arrested and charged with violating the terms of his sex offender registration for the second time.

    Michael L. Vanheck, 33, of 702 Buckner St., was arrested last Thursday at a store on South Jackson Street at about 9 a.m.

    According to Vanheck's arrest citation, he had registered his address with probation and parole staff members as 3735 Bengal Road in Campbellsville.

  • Sunday kicks off National Farmers Market Week

     

    Spring might have gotten off to a late start, but there is an ample supply of locally grown tomatoes, sweet corn, green beans and other fresh produce at the Taylor County Farmers' Market.

    Sunday will kick off the 15th annual National Farmers' Market Week, a tradition started by the United States Department of Agriculture to recognize the important role farmers' markets play in the agricultural and food economy. The USDA is encouraging consumers across the nation to support their local farmers markets Aug. 3-9.

  • Taxes can help pay your hospital bills

    It began in the early 1990s, but even so, not all residents know they can receive credit on their bills for the property taxes they pay to Taylor Regional Hospital.

    TRH CEO Jane Wheatley said the hospital has, to date, given residents $2,889,753 in credit on their tax bills.

    Wheatley said the hospital allows residents to receive the amount of property taxes they paid to the hospital as a credit on their bills.

  • Schools have a lot on their plates with menu planning

     

    Local schools work hard to provide nutritious and appetizing meals for students.

    Following state and federal guidelines, school breakfasts and lunches are all balanced and contain vegetables, fruits, grains and meats.

    At Campbellsville schools, all students eat breakfast and lunch for free.

    The majority of Taylor County students eat free, though the number isn't quite high enough for all students to receive free lunch.

  • Local armory to remain open, get new assignment

     

    The soldiers now have a new mission. But, on the outside, the public might not even know anything is different.

    Since 1947, the Campbellsville National Armory has been home to Battery B of the National Guard's 1/623rd Field Artillery. But on Saturday, Battery B will move to Elizabethtown and the Campbellsville armory will be home to the 203rd Forward Support Company.

    The change was announced Monday in a news release from the National Guard.

  • Crops take hit from limited rainfall

     

    Cool, damp soil during the spring planting season has caused repercussions for this year's corn, soybean and tobacco crop.

    Taylor County Extension Agent for Natural Resources Pat Hardesty said spring's heavy soil conditions have led to many fields being affected by infertile soil compaction. This condition results in shallow root growth with limited water holding capacity.

    "With soils being too wet, a lot of times when it dries out and stays dry like it has, it will limit root growth," Hardesty said.

  • After accidental shooting, trooper to compete in IRONMAN race

     

    He is determined. Nothing will stop him from crossing that finish line.

    Nearly a year ago, Nathan Rhodes wasn't sure if he would ever walk again. He had accidentally shot himself in the foot, and doctors said the odds of him losing his foot were good.

    Fast-forward a year later, Rhodes is in training for his second IRONMAN race. Though it's something he says he never wanted to do before his injury, he is set on completing the race now. And he won't let anything stop him.

  • Water Fight!

     

    The water was flying at Taylor County Public Library on Friday afternoon, and it was every man for himself to stay dry.

    When the library began its summer reading program this year, staff members set a goal for participants to read 1,000 books. When the final tally was in, the children and teens participating read four times that amount.

    For surpassing the goal, library staff members promised they would participate in a water fight, pitting the staff against the children.