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Local News

  • Grand jury indicts 11

    A Taylor County Grand Jury recently handed down indictments against 11 people.

    Among those indicted are the following individuals:

    ·      Erik J. Sanders, 18, of Union Church Road in Columbia, on charges of first-degree burglary and theft of a firearm. The charges stem from an incident in which Sanders was arrested in connection with a break-in at Big Al’s Gun Shop on Fairview Road.

  • Amazon honors veterans

     

    Although Veterans Day has passed, a local company held a ceremony honoring Veterans on Tuesday morning.

    The Campbellsville Amazon Fulfillment Center held a free lunch on Tuesday to honor and recognize the veterans and veterans’ spouses that are employed there.

    Amazon Manager Carlos De La Garza said there are more than 70 veterans employed at the Amazon Fulfillment Center, and several other spouses of veterans are employed there, too. Across Kentucky, more than 1,000 veterans are employed by Amazon and around 17,000 nationally.

  • Tornado touches down in Taylor County

     

    Local farmer Rod Phillips and his wife were in an equipment building on their property on Cave Road around 6 p.m. Saturday evening when the winds began to pick up outside.

    Phillips said they were finishing feeding their dogs when they heard the winds begin to gain strength and they began to feel the building shake.

    The two lay down on the floor of the building, hoping to remain safe as the storm passed through. The worst part of the storm probably only lasted about 45 seconds, Phillips said.

  • Fiscal court discusses use of red and blue lights by coroner's office

     

    The final payment for the Taylor County Fire Station and whether to let Coroner Daniel Cook use red and blue lights were the hot topics at this month’s Taylor County Fiscal Court meeting.

    Cook must ask for written permission for he and his deputies to use red and/or blue lights on their coroner cars and that the fiscal court must sign off on that.

    Magistrate John Gaines could not be convinced that they were needed.

    The other four magistrates did sign the form Cook brought to suffice the KRS 189.290 document.

     

  • Wise named chair of Senate Education Committee

     

    Campbellsville and Taylor County are strongly represented when it comes to education in the state legislature, especially with the latest announcement that State Sen. Max Wise (R-Campbellsville) has been named chairman of the Senate Education Committee.

    In a statement released on Wise’s Twitter page, he briefly outlined his plan in this new role.

  • Ashby gets life for 2016 murder

     

    A Taylor County man has been ordered to spend the rest of his life behind bars for a murder he committed last year.

    Rocky T. Ashby, 37, was sentenced to life in prison in Taylor County Circuit Court Tuesday for the murder of 35-year-old Tara Simpson Lamer in July 2016.

    However, Ashby will be able to appear before a parole board after serving 20 years of his sentence.

    Ashby faced charges of murder-domestic violence, second-degree burglary, and first-degree wanton endangerment from the incident that occurred on July 16, 2016.

  • Two arrested on drug charges

     

    Two Campbellsville men were arrested on drug charges Saturday following an investigation.

    According to a release from the Taylor County Sheriff’s Office, 30-year-old Doug Wheeler and 33-year-old Donte Hatcher were arrested and face drug trafficking charges.

    During a routine patrol, a deputy with the Taylor County Sheriff’s Office located Hatcher near a business on North Columbia Avenue. The report states that the deputy recognized Hatcher and knew that he had an outstanding warrant.

  • New deli aims to offer more dining options for residents

    Diane Marinelli did not plan to stay in Campbellsville for very long.

    The plan was simple. Help her mother, Ruth Knoblauch, move into her new home in Campbellsville after she retired, and then go back home to resume her normal life.

    After Marinelli helped her mother move, she stayed in the area for a while helping her unpack and get adjusted to a new city. Although she had planned on going back home, instead, Marinelli bought a home in Taylor County.

  • Audit results released for county clerk's office

    Kentucky State Auditor Mike Harmon released the results of his audit of Taylor County Clerk Mark Carney’s office last week.

    According to the results of the audit, auditing standards require the auditor’s letter to communicate whether the financial statement “presents fairly the receipts, disbursements, and excess fees of the Taylor County Clerk in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America.”

  • City will continue to use old police station

     

    It was announced at Monday’s regularly scheduled meeting of the Campbellsville City Council that Campbellsville’s old police station on Terri Street still be used after some cosmetic changes.

    The building will be used as a one-stop shop for such things as planning, zoning, engineering and code enforcements.

    “Hopefully this will help folks for having to run all over town to get things done,” Mayor Tony Young said.

    The police station moved to 132 South Central Ave. in June.